Teen Reviewed: The Odyssey​


odyssey2014Title: Odyssey
Author: Homer
Summary: The classic story of Odysseus, a Greek hero, returning home from the Trojan War. It takes him ten years to return to his wife, Penelope, and son, Telemachus, in Ithaca. Having been trapped on an island with the goddess Calypso, Odysseus is finally able to begin his journey home through the help of the goddess Athena. On his trek home, Odysseus encounters all kinds of monsters and setbacks; a cyclops Odysseus blinds, a massive whirlpool that nearly sinks his ship, the underworld, a six-headed monster, and the sea-god Poseidon who’s angry with Odysseus for blinding his son, the cyclops. Using his wit, charm, and heroic abilities, Odysseus battles his way home where his wife is being courted by a horde of suitors who try to convince her that her husband is never returning home.
Six Word Review: Classic stories are definitely worth reading.
I started reading because: the Odyssey is the second oldest surviving written work. (The Illiad, the first part of the story of the Odyssey, is the oldest).
I would give this book 10/10 stars because it contains so many elements of stories that are used in modern storytelling. It has humor, it has romance, and it has action. It’s a well-rounded story.
I loved the fantastical elements. Greek mythology is very cool. I hated… I mean I didn’t really hate anything.
If the lead character Odysseus was in a high school yearbook, he/she would be voted Most Likely To: Succeed At Everything Ever
Anything else we should know? Sometimes the concern with older works is that they won’t be as relatable as modern works, but I assure you the Odyssey is plenty relatable.

–Regina, 18, West Seattle

Library Goings-on: 7/28 – 7/31

Teen Social Hour:

What do you Teen social hourdo for fun?  Do you like playing video games or board games?  Do you like listening to music or surfing the Internet?  Do you like talking and texting, laughing out loud?  Do you like snacking and chatting with friends?  If you answered “yes,” at least once, then the Teen Social Hour maybe just the place for you. Come by yourself, bring a friend, or join your friends for video games, board games, music, computers, food, and fun. This are Teen Space events not to miss!

Monday, July 28:

flappy bird

From 3 – 5 pm @ High Point: Game On + Hour of Code. Get some gaming in on the Wii or Kinect, play board games, eat snacks and try your hand at Hour of Code’s drag and drop programming.

 

 

BWB

From 6:30 – 7:30 pm @ NorthgateBow-Wows and Books. Practice reading with a new friend who is warm, friendly, and a perfect listener! Certified therapy dogs and their handlers join young readers to read one-on-one in a relaxing and nonjudgmental environment.  Teen volunteer opportunity!!

Tuesday, July 29

 

digital teen drop inFrom 1 – 3 pm @ West Seattle: Teen Re-Creation Drop In. Need some space and support for your digital projects this summer? Drop in for help, ideas and snacks!

 

 

chess

From 4 – 5:30 pm @ High Point: Drop In Chess.  Come play a game of chess! Children and teens are invited to drop by for fun and casual games of chess.  All skill levels are welcome. Chess sets and guidance by an adult chess coach will be available.

 

science lab

From 5 – 7 pm @ Magnolia: Hands-On Science Lab. Dive into science and learn something new! We’ll do a variety of fun experiments to find out how things work and why.

Wednesday, July 30

calligraphy

From 2 – 3:30 pm @ South Park: Calligraphy: The Art of Lettering.  Learn the history of different alphabets from local teaching artist Amaranta Sandys, then practice basic calligraphy techniques with a variety of writing tools. For tweens and teens.

 

Teen Advisers

From 3 – 5 pm @ Green Lake: Teen Adviser Meeting. As part of our Teen Adviser Group, students entering high school can earn service learning credit at The Seattle Public Library while working on special projects as a group. Applications are required.

 

3-d printing

From 3 – 4:30 pm @ Northeast: Digital Frabication Showcase.  Excited about 3-D printing and laser printing? Discover fabrication techniques & learn about design modeling with experimental digital artist Meghan Trainor. Registration is required.

 

Check back often as we’ll be sharing as many of our programs as we can. You can also find all of our Summer Programming by going to the Calendar of Events and limiting the audience to “Teens.”

We’d love to hear back from you if you attend a program.  You can take pictures, make visual art, write us a reaction post, or just share general thoughts.  Touch-base with your local librarian, or e-mail them to us and we’ll share them here or at our new Tumblr!

Here’s to a great summer, Seattle!  :D

Elephants (An Acrostic)

Editor’s Note: Camilla, a 19-year-old intern at 826 Seattle, has selected some excellent work that 826 students are producing this summer to share with us on Push To Talk.  This is the third installment in that series.  

Camilla’s Note: This poem is wildly imaginative and totally unexpected.  The acrostic structure, which can often feel creatively confining, is used here as license to go crazy with the topic.

  

Elephants (An Acrostic)

By Gin, age 5

 

Elephants are grumpy

Love lilies

Elephants fly all over the world

Pull the earth out of outer space

Hats wear elephants

An elephant is tiny

No elephant ever came to Earth

Trees are silly

So elephants are always going to be on Mars

Gin

About the Author:

Gin is a first grader at the North Seattle French School. She enjoys rock climbing, writing, and hanging out. She would like to travel to New York and see the Statue of Liberty.

Manga Reviewed: The Wallflower

wallflower1Title: The Wallflower
Author: Tomoko Hayakawa
Summary: Four pretty boys have to turn a horror-loving girl into a perfect lady
Gut reaction: shallow but fun
Why: The heroine, Sunako, grows on you and isn’t annoying. I find that the constant chibi drawing style of only her is, though. The four boys, especially the main, Kyohei, are quite annoying but they don’t get in the way. The plot is going nowhere and allows for little to no development. Also, each chapter is a repeat of the same old scenario.
Who would like this book: Shoujo fans and fans of light-hearted simple fun stories would like this. It’s a good light read, so I’ll probably follow until it becomes a pure love story.

– Lexie, 16, West Seattle

It’s so easy to post to our tumblr!

Did you know? You don’t even need your own tumblr.  If you have something rad to say, show off, or sound off about, just go here and share it with us.  Your fave books, movies, homemade GIFs, handmade creations, book trailers or book spine poetry, photography, and inspirations!

We’ll get it up, presto magesto!  :D

http://teenspl.tumblr.com/submit

Indie romance, very cool, very artsy.

The DisenchantmentsTitle: The Disenchantments
Author: Nina LaCour

Summary: Told from teenage boy Colby’s point of view, this novel follows the adventures of Colby, Colby’s best friend Bev, and sisters Meg and Alexa.  Bev, Meg, and Alexa, though they’re not so great at playing music, are the members of The Disenchantments, a girl band that is successful mostly due to the fact that its members are drop-dead gorgeous.  Colby and Bev have graduated from high school and are planning to spend the summer touring with Meg and Alexa before Bev and Colby head off to Europe to see the world.  At least, that’s the plan, but just as they kick of their road trip/tour in Colby’s uncle’s Volkswagen van Bev reveals to Colby that she applied to college and will be attending art school in the fall.  It’s a story about growing up and figuring out what to do after high school.

Six Word Review:  Indie romance, very cool, very artsy.

I started reading because:  A friend of mine told me that if I like John Green’s work, I’ll like this book.

I would give this book 9/10 stars because it’s extremely relatable if you’re currently in high school.  It’s kind of quirky and very alternative.  A fun read.

I loved the journey that each of the characters go on.  Both the physical and metaphorical.  I hated how badly it made me want to go on a road trip.  It sounds so ideal.

If Meg was in a high school yearbook, she would be voted Most Likely To:  Be The Physical Embodiment Of A Rainbow.

Anything else we should know?  The novel contains a lot of contemporary artistic things like street art. It provides a realistic portrayal of what it’s like to be a teenager today.

–Regina, 18, West Seattle