Monthly Archives: September 2014

October Book Horoscopes!

book

Why hello there, teenage (and non-teenage) blog readers! This is the second issue of Greenwood TAB’s monthly book horoscopes – which are, to recap, book recommendations based on your Zodiac sign. Included in this list are books of diverse genres and reading levels. ALL of them are great, so if the book recommended for your sign isn’t working out for you, make sure to check out some of the others! Happy reading 🙂

 

Aries  Number the Stars by Lois Lowrynumber

Annemarie is a ten-year-old Danish girl who loves her family and likes to run footraces with the other children at lunchtime. Life has gone on more or less as usual since the German soldiers have taken over control of her city, until one day they come knocking at her door to take her best friend Ellen away. Though this is a simple, easy-level read, it’s a great story about what it really means to be brave.

art of

Taurus The Art of Racing In The Rain by Garth Stein

This book is narrated by an old dog named Enzo who has decided it is his time to die and is preparing to say goodbye to his master and head on to the next life – in which, he suspects, he will be reincarnated as a human being. Enzo tells a beautiful story of the love, loyalty, and history that lies between him and his master. You will learn more about being human from this dog than you might think.

Continue reading

Calling all poets! Don’t miss our Teen Poetry Slam, October 3, 6:30 p.m. at Central Library.

We’ll bring the coffee, you bring the words. 
poetry slam flyer

No-Stress Zone: Final Tips and Advice for Organization

studycat Hello students! Welcome back to The No-Stress Zone!

In the last couple of posts, I’ve given you all some suggestions how to organize your school papers into binders/folders, how to organize those binders/folders into your school bag or backpack, and how to organize your homework and study hub a.k.a. your desk or wherever your choose to study and do homework.

In this post, I will be signing off these organizational tips with some final tips and advice. Continue reading

My Summer of Volunteering: Emily

SWTA group of teens spent their summer volunteering at the Southwest Branch Library.  Now Emily tells us what she really thought about her volunteer experience assisting with programs, planning a program for other teens, and helping out their librarians!  

I think this is a great program and that it gave me new experiences and taught me a few things about people and community. Whenever we held a program, I would think at the end of it that a lot of the people I was volunteering with and a lot of the people who came to the program were people that I wouldn’t expect, just by looking at them, to be the kind of people I would socialize with. I admit to it, a lot of the people who come to the programs at the library would be people I would not choose to say hello to in a setting like school. But the programs at the library showed me that if you just talk to people and reach out to someone you normally wouldn’t, they will surprise you, and you will find that the way they look has nothing to do with who they are.

Of course, I am not a horrible person and this philosophy is not new to me, but I have never had many real life experiences with talking to different people, so this program gave me an opportunity to go outside my comfort zone and practice what I believe in, which is not judging people by the way they look. This program also benefits people in the community by, as you mentioned, bringing together mixed demographics and giving all types of people access to the library and it’s resources. Continue reading

Sin City 2 – sexist potrayal of women, but cool visual stylings.

Sin City 2I recently watched Sin City 2 and the animation and style of it was very cool and entertaining.  The action scenes were brutal yet well executed.  However, the sexism and portrayal of women, of course, was not missed (nor was it surprising considering this was a Sin City adaptation). However it was still disappointing having to see women being identified as simply sexually appealing characters for the entertainment of the targeted audience.

Each character’s different plots intertwined nicely and no character showed up without a reason.  The back stories all began with their separate (sometimes shared) antagonist. The acting was really great as well, showing quite raw emotion.  This movie impressed me despite the somewhat incredibly cheesy moments and cliché tag lines, and I do recommend it but please be cautious of the more intense moments in the film.

–Sophie, Southeast Region TAG

The Perks of Being a Wallflower – Starts heavy but ends with hope.

perks of being a wallflowerTitle: The Perks Of Being A Wallflower

Author: Stephen Chbosky

Summary: You’ve probably seen the movie, so you maybe already know the plot. But, if you haven’t, The Perks Of Being A Wallflower is a story about high schooler and wallflower Charlie. He’s shy, he loves English, and he is still grieving the loss of his friend from grade school who committed suicide. As he navigates high school, he is introduced to Patrick, a slacker senior who’s gay, and Patrick’s step-sister Sam, also a senior, who is gorgeous and happens to become Charlie’s crush. Meeting these two is just one of the many turning points for Charlie.

Six Word Review: Starts heavy but ends with hope.

I started reading because: After reading the first page I was hooked. Charlie has such a genuine voice. It’s compelling.

I would give this book 9/10 stars because it’s very relatable.

I loved that the novel was told in the format of letters written by Charlie. It gave it a pure and honest feel and it made Charlie seem more real because you could imagine him writing the words as you read his letters. I hated how emotional the novel was at times. It’s a pretty heavy read so it can make you pretty blue. That’s the point of books, but it doesn’t make the occasional feeling of sadness any less gross-feeling.

If the lead character Charlie was in a high school yearbook, he would be voted Most Likely To: Write A Novel.

Anything else we should know? I know most people have only seen the movie, but I would really like to encourage you to read the book even if you don’t feel like it’s your thing. The novel has a lot more to offer than the movie. There are extra parts and new insights to be gained from reading it.

–Regina, 18, West Seattle

WTS