Sophie’s Books that Make You Think

fault-in-our-starsReview #1 (The Fault in Our Stars)

The Fault in Our Stars by John Green is a tragic, yet youthful and captivating book. It features a girl named Hazel Grace who meets a boy named Augustus Waters at a support group for people who have cancer. Augustus uses his wish that he received when he first learned of his cancer to fly to Amsterdam to meet a Peter Van Houten, the author of Hazel’s favorite book, An Imperial Affliction. Right from the beginning, Hazel’s sarcasm mixed with Augustus’s charm stuck to me, and have ended being two of my favorite characters in any book I’ve ever read. The writing was very unique, in that it used beautiful analogies, and was able to blend in a lot of humor despite its tragic topic. To any readers out there that enjoy a little mix of everything I would definitely recommend this book.

Review #2 (The Perks of Being a Wallflower)

The Perks of Being a Wallflower, by Stephen Chbosky is in a perksWallflowerway very interesting in that it is vague so that you have to infer what is happening. This book is about a boy who goes by the alias name as Charlie who is beginning high school and decides to document his life through letters to the his friend, the reader. Charlie has no friends, except for Michael who committed suicide back in eighth grade. When Charlie begins high school he meets Patrick, Sam and many of their friends who teach him how to have fun.  I really enjoyed this book because it is in a way, a coming-of-age type of book that really introduces the reader to many different things that are important in realizing that happens to everyone. The author was able to expose the types of things that teenagers and people go through in life. I would definitely recommend this book to anyone of any age.

Lord of the FliesReview #3 (Lord of The Flies)

Lord of The Flies, by William Golding is chilling, and showed the savage side of a human. This book begins with a plane crash on an island, and a group of boys with no adults stranded. Humanity versus savagery is a big theme in this book. It quickly transitions from them trying to remain together as a group to a chaotic and bloody scene. This book was really creative in the symbolic representations that the author had chosen. And I found it really interesting to how the boys had divided the way that they did, and how much they had changed from British school boys to savages. I would definitely recommend this book to anyone who enjoys symbolism and the capability of how savage a person can really become.

–Sophie, Columbia, Teen Adviser

COL

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s