Category Archives: Opinions

Choosing a College: Teen Perspectives

College WheelIt’s just past the time that high school seniors have decided on their college, and juniors are looking ahead to applications. It’s nice being able to talk to someone who’s gone through the same process that many juniors will go through. There’s much to think about: the SAT, the ACT, good grades, finding a school that fits your interests, essays, applications, visits, and more.

We have the perspective of two high schoolers: Brooke who has been through the application and acceptance process, and Claire, who is just beginning it.

Brooke: Finding the right college is really difficult. My decision came down to two schools, and a lot of different things factored into my final choice. You have to consider location, class difficulty,cost, the “feel” of the school and it’s social aspects, and a ton of other stuff. With the two schools I had, one was much more prestigious but a lot more costly, and the other one had given me scholarship money, but wasn’t particularly well-known.

I had to weigh my options: would the more abundant opportunities at the one school outweigh its cost? Would I be happy in the towns the schools were in? Did I feel welcome and included by current and other prospective students? You may never have that moment where you just know, like a lot of people talk about. You have to trust you’ll make the right decison for you.

Continue reading

Jacob – What I look for in a novel…

novelsThe term “novel” encompasses so much territory that it seems silly to talk about them as a whole. Everything from Anna Karenina to the Twilight series falls in that category. Nevertheless, I’m going to try to explain what kinds of features that I enjoy in a novel and why I like them. Obviously, these are just my preferences. I don’t expect everyone to agree.

According to Dilbert cartoonist Scott Adams, “Movies and books form a mental structure in your head of what is possible and what is not. But these are artificial structures based on the rules of fiction. They do not necessarily represent what is practical or possible in the real world.” By this, he means that the principles of cause and effect work differently in fiction than in real life. If, say, someone in a movie punches a jerk in the face in the middle of school, and everyone respects him for it, you might get the wrong idea about what would actually happen in real life. Probably something closer to a long term suspension. He’s saying that if you read a lot of fiction, you might start to confuse reality and fantasy, resulting in some mistaken impressions of how the world really works. That’s one reason why I like books that have good internal consistency. Continue reading

Why summer camp is (literally) the best thing ever!!!!

I’m sure that most of us have as least one traumatic memory from our first time at sleep away camp. Don’t you vividly remember the horror of being sent away alone for several nights amongst prepubescent strangers like yourself? I know I do. I catch the first whiff of the briny breeze as I step out of the car at the ferry terminal in downtown Seattle. The air is chilly at 8 am despite it is the middle of July.  Greeted by swarms of kid and teenagers alike, all of them here for the same reason as I am: to be cast away for 7 dreadful days to Vashon Island.  Destination: Camp Sealth.

camp sealth

There is a flurry of duffel bags and sorting out boat tickets and hugs and kisses goodbyes to parents as each of us solemnly depart. We are practically stepping off into the abyss towards the great unknown, A.K.A. a white ferry on Puget Sound. There are tears; there are protests, yet exhausted parents still must shove their reluctant children aboard, a twinkle of guilt along with relief in their tired paternal eyes. I float among these hectic crowds; my dad is already gone. I’m yet to cry. Instead I am a speck of dust being herded like a sheep, backpack and Northface duffel in tow, my only company the novel Legend by Marie Lu.  Guided aboard a packed vessel where I will feel incredibly alone. Continue reading

Radio Journalism Workshop (Registration is required)

p00twgfzSaturday, May 9, 2015, 2 – 3:30 p.m. at the University Branch Library

Become a media-maker! Learn about public radio journalism in this fun, hands-on interviewing workshop with professional audio recorders.

 

Learn about public radio journalism and interviewing with KUOW’s RadioActive Media.

In this fun, hands-on workshop, teens learn about what kinds of questions get people talking, and then interview each other using professional audio recorders. This program is open to teens 13-19 years of age.

RadioActive is a radio journalism program for teens, based at KUOW 94.9 radio.

Teens ages 16-18 may want to stay afterwards to learn more about a competitive paid summer intership and get assistance filling out an application.

Registration is required. Please call the University Branch at 206-684-4063 to register.

Philosophy: A dead field of study?

philosophyAs time passes I find myself more and more captivated by the core values seemingly promoted by philosophy — the way of thinking about complex issues in relation to one’s self, one’s knowledge and how one conducts his/her life.  Being someone who considers themselves in relation to others a relatively deep thinker, I enjoy the act of metacognating (thinking about one’s thoughts).  Philosophy has many different branches — metaphysics, epistemology, etc.  Broaching topics from existence, the process of thought, knowledge etc., philosophy is generally thought to be a large field of science with many sub-topics.

Why is philosophy so broad in comparison to other sciences? Well, the simple answer is, it’s not. However, the longer answer is due to the fact that figuring out how to best logically reason out one’s own rationality requires a lot of different elements in order to do so.  Now, why is it that nowadays people speak of philosophy as a “dead” field?  How can a field that involves critical thinking, self-awareness and determining the important questions surrounding one’s existence be pronounced dead?  Unbeknownst to me until recently this seems to be the common notion surrounding this study of thought as well as other humanity-related subjects and liberal arts. Continue reading

My Adventures at the Crest Cinema Theater

Crest Theater SHR

If you live in the Seattle area, you may have heard of the Crest Cinema Theater. Maybe you are a film fan and have been there many times, or maybe you’ve only heard people rave about how cool this particular theater is but have never been yourself.  Either way, the Crest has something to offer for everyone, and several unique features that make it one of the best places to see a film around Seattle.

I recently made my first trip to the Crest to see the movie Big Eyes.  Now you may be thinking, “you saw Big Eyes there? It isn’t in theaters anymore and it’s not on DVD yet!”  Well, that is one of the features of the Crest that makes it so unique: it shows films that have been out for some time and aren’t in the major theaters anymore.  The Crest is also currently showing Gone Girl, which is already out on DVD, and The Penguins of Madagascar in 3D, among others.  So if you missed seeing in a theater that really great movie that all your friends have been talking about, try the Crest, it might be playing there.

One incredible benefit of showing movies that have been out for some time is that tickets are SUPER cheap. We’re talking $4 here compared to the $11.50 that you would pay at any other theater. This means that even students can afford to go out to the movies! Continue reading

When Global Warming Ruins Your Weekend

Global-Warming-2

This weekend I was supposed to be skiing, but instead I am at home, angrily typing into a computer. Now you may ask: why am I not skiing with my family this weekend? Answer: because there’s no snow!!! And why is there no snow? I’m thinking it might be because of our ever thinning ozone layer and the gradual warming of the globe. This weekend I was supposed to take my best friend in the world up to a ski lodge I have been going to since I was a little kid, but I can’t.

Because skiing this weekend was canceled due to the fact that there is NO SNOW.

Did you know that 9 of the 10 hottest years on record have been in the 2000’s?  I found that out recently and it’s very distressing.  Global warming is a real problem, I know that it’s something most of us try to ignore a lot of the time, but the fact of the matter is we can’t do that any more.  This is an issue that literally will not go away.  We aren’t getting any more ozone back; it isn’t something we can rebuild. The earth isn’t going to become less polluted over time. This is a kind of problem where the only thing we can do is try to slow or stop the damage before it gets any worse.

Now I’m no scientist, and I don’t think I’m the person who’s going to solve the bigger crisis, but it’s the little things you can do. Things like unplugging chargers, walking a few more places, turning off lights, consuming less, I know these don’t seem like big things, but imagine if everyone did them!  So next time you’re hoping for a snow day, maybe remember that we might not have many of those left.

P.S. Please don’t drink bottled water.  Seriously, why would you do that?  We live in the Pacific Northwest.  Bottled water wishes it tasted as good as our water. Just stop.

An Inconvenient Truth

Bag It

–Grace, 17, Greenwood

GWD