Category Archives: Volunteering

Earn $150 and service learning for telling YOUR story!

YESYOUTH

RACIAL

EQUITY

PROJECT

SEATTLE

 OPEN TO YOUTH AGES 14-19

  • learn how to talk about race & racism
  • tell YOUR story
  • build a social justice community
  • gain leadership skills & new perspectives

WHEN

  • Start : February 23, 2015
  • End : May 23, 2015
  • Mondays + Wednesdays, 4:00-6:00 PM

WHERE

Application Deadline is FEB 13, 2015.

For more details, check out the linked flyer!

**All libary locations are closed today in observation of Martin Luther King, Jr. Day**

mlk

MLK Day of Service.  MLK Day Activities.  MLK, Jr. @ the library.

What we said about MLK, Jr. Day last year.

 

Have you considered the Peace Corps?

sagalandwomencelebratenewlibraryMy name is Sagal. I am a Peace Corps Volunteer serving in a small land-locked country in southern Africa, Swaziland. I work as a community developer in a village with an emphasis on youth. My projects focus on youth empowerment, HIV/AIDS education, food security, income-generating and literacy.

My work is challenging but also rewarding. This month my community and I opened a library!  The library project was a complete success because the community was very involved.  The youth and the parents helped with the implementation of the library project.  As a result, we have a wonderful, inviting, library room that’s fully owned and operated by the community.

As a child, I loved libraries!  I grew up in northern Seattle and I use to spend countless hours at the Lake City Library.  So, when I arrived in Swaziland and a local teacher asked for my help in establishing a library in the community, I was very much excited.

Peace Corps Volunteers work with the nonprofit Books for Africa (BFA) to establish libraries in Swaziland.  BFA collects donated books throughout the United States.  They then sort, organize the books by reading level and prepare them for shipment.  The Peace Corps office funds half of the project expenses (transportation cost and the librarian trainings) and the other half is fundraised by volunteers like myself.  This year, we opened 30 libraries including the one in my community and next year we plan to open 30 more.

Libraries don’t exist in the rural communities and we are trying to change that. One village at a time!  I can go on forever about libraries but I will stop here!

–Sagal, Lake City, Guest Blogger

The Doney Clinic – vet service and more for pets of the homeless

Walk into the Doney Clinic at 3:00 and you’ll be met with the sight of people rushing from a white van packed to the brim with veterinary supplies to the inside of a well-worn building located in downtown Seattle.  Outside, a line of the homeless with their pets: dogs, cats, ferrets, parrots, etc. stand against the side of the wall, talking cheerfully to their neighbors. “Okay,  Number One,“ a woman calls from the doorway.  The first person in line dutifully comes inside, leading their mixed breed dog by his red leash.

The Doney Clinic is a volunteer-run veterinary clinic founded by Dr. Bud Doney in 1985.  It is dedicated to delivering veterinary service to the pets of the homeless, along with food, leashes, carriers, toys, etc.  In order to be seen at the clinic, you must have proof of an income of less than $750 a month, a residency in Seattle, and must be willing to neuter or spay your pet. Neutering and spaying services provided.

The Doney Clinic is located in the Union Gospel Mission, at 318 2nd Ave Ext S, Seattle WA, 98104. It is open on the 2nd and 4th Saturday of every month.

Rabies, Feline Distemper, Canine Distemper and Feline Leukemia vaccines are provided, along with de-wormers, thyroid medication and other such medicines. Gauze and antiseptic are available for more pressing injuries. Vials for blood and skin tests are on the right side of the picture. Flea medicine is extremely expensive for the providers of the clinic, so it costs $5.  Many animals receive shots at the Doney Clinic.

Many qualified, dedicated veterinarians volunteer at the Doney Clinic every other Saturday. They will see the pets at three metal tables set up in front of the vaccines.  They check the basic health of the animal, as well as any injuries, and administer vaccines.  If they find anything of concern, skin and/or blood tests are taken, and results of the tests come back on a following Saturday.  All results are recorded into the notebook for all test documentation.

There are also several pets that are regulars, and come in almost every Saturday the clinic is open. All pets, old and young, are cared for, thanks to the many volunteers and veterinarians.  Their doors remain open because of donations and a volunteer crew many of whom have volunteered for over 28 years. You can look the clinic up at www.doneyclinic.org.

Thanks to Paula Shifley, Carol Dougherty, and the other wonderful volunteers.

*It should be noted that while many of these pets in the photos are kittens and puppies, the majority are much older. These are just the pictures that I took that day.

 –Emma, Northeast, Teen Adviser

NET

 

 

Editor’s Note:  Doney Clinic volunteers were just mentioned in Seattle Times!

Volunteering: how to find your niche

animal volunteer

Take me to the library!

In fifth grade, my teacher challenged every kid in my class to “do something to change the world.  Starting today.”  Every eleven-year-old in the room nodded, hopeful but also doubtful. Change the world, you mean, like, plant a tree?  I wondered.  What could a fifth-grader do the change the world?

One of my friends decided she was going to volunteer at an animal shelter.  She did all the research, and found exactly one shelter in all of Seattle that did not specify the minimum volunteer age.  This was Animal Talk Rescue, a non-profit, no-kill hole-in-the-wall with an owner who might have been just a little crazy.  In a good way, of course.  My entire friend group decided to start working there, and over the next two years I logged over 100 hours cleaning mice cages and feeding the iguana (his name was Boot).  It was a good way to get started volunteering, but didn’t really offer me any experience I could actually use.

I stopped going to Animal Talk somewhere in the seventh grade, mostly because I didn’t feel I was of any use.  My friends and I were not the only ones who had struggled to find suitable volunteer locations, it seemed.  Because of its lack of a minimum volunteer age, the people at Animal Talk were almost exclusively high-schoolers struggling to complete their service learning credit.  There were so many kids who wanted to work there, you had to sign up for spots sometimes months in advance.  I couldn’t help but wonder, am I really doing anything worthwhile, or am I just filling another spot? Continue reading

The Next Big War – Climate Change

polarbearice The one that most of us don’t even know is happening.

Climate change, which is also sometimes called Global Warming, is something that has been happening for generations. The warning signs have been there but a lot of us have chosen to ignore it. It’s the next big war, a monster that we, humans, have created and now must fight. So… Continue reading

Want to make a difference?

Teen Adviser.JPG

Be a Teen Adviser at the Magnolia Branch.

The Teen Adviser program is for high school aged youth (aged 14-19) interested in the library and leadership. We are looking for highly motivated individuals who want to make a difference in the library as well as the community. Participants receive community service learning credit.

Requirements

  • Attend 1.5 hour monthly meeting (for three months)
  • Complete 3-8 hours of additional service
  • Active participation

Tasks Include

  • Program Development
  • Volunteering at events or running the programs you develop
  • Working with a variety of media to document or market an event.

If this interests you our first meeting is November 5th at 4 PM. Additional details including directions to the branch and a link to the application found at the SPL website.