Tag Archives: actors

My Adventures at the Crest Cinema Theater

Crest Theater SHR

If you live in the Seattle area, you may have heard of the Crest Cinema Theater. Maybe you are a film fan and have been there many times, or maybe you’ve only heard people rave about how cool this particular theater is but have never been yourself.  Either way, the Crest has something to offer for everyone, and several unique features that make it one of the best places to see a film around Seattle.

I recently made my first trip to the Crest to see the movie Big Eyes.  Now you may be thinking, “you saw Big Eyes there? It isn’t in theaters anymore and it’s not on DVD yet!”  Well, that is one of the features of the Crest that makes it so unique: it shows films that have been out for some time and aren’t in the major theaters anymore.  The Crest is also currently showing Gone Girl, which is already out on DVD, and The Penguins of Madagascar in 3D, among others.  So if you missed seeing in a theater that really great movie that all your friends have been talking about, try the Crest, it might be playing there.

One incredible benefit of showing movies that have been out for some time is that tickets are SUPER cheap. We’re talking $4 here compared to the $11.50 that you would pay at any other theater. This means that even students can afford to go out to the movies! Continue reading

The Artist’s use of imagery to tell a story without dialogue makes it very special

the artistAs a film student, getting to meet professional actors and directors is greatly inspirational for me. I recently got the opportunity to meet the writer and director of The Artist, Michel Hazanavicius, and one of the actresses from the film, Berenice Bejo. They were speaking at an event that my film class attended, during which we had the opportunity to ask them questions and analyze their film The Artist. The most exciting part for me was to hear about the reasons for making the movie and what Michel and Berenice gained from it.

The Artist came into the world of cinema at a very interesting time. In the twenty-first century most people think of hit movies as comedies, action movies with more violence than plot and romantic “chick flicks”. However, if you say the term silent film people generally think of old movies made in the early 1900s. Yet The Artist is a one of a kind film, as it is a silent film released in 2011 instead of 1920. It was brave of Michel to release such a unique film into an arena of very modern films. I think this movie in particular really gets to the core of classic filmmaking. It’s not about violent action or intense dialogue; it’s about images and emotion. To me, the images of films are what separates them from books and what makes them so unique. The emphasis on imagery and using it to tell a story without dialogue is what makes The Artist so special. Continue reading