Tag Archives: books

Hiking in Washington

Upper Falls Wallace State Park

The Upper Falls

Over spring break, my friend and I took a road trip over to Wallace Falls in Goldbar, Washington, and then went on a hike. Wallace Falls is a Washington State Park, and thus we needed a Discover Pass to park there. The Discover Pass is this yellow slip that you hang on the front mirror in your car, which allows you to park at these state parks. The Discover Pass is $10 for a day, or $30 annually. We bought the annual pass, since we knew that we would be hiking at other state parks through the year.

Once we got to Wallace Falls state park, we zipped up our layers (for me, I wore 3 coats, including one fleece and one rain coat). On the first small part of the trail, you’re walking under large electrial towers. Before we entered the woods, we stopped at one viewpoint that looked towards mountains, though it was too cloudy to see the mountains. We then entered the forest, we were met with a William Wordsworth quote: “Come forth into the light of things. Let nature be your teacher.” After stopping to take a few pictures, we ventured on. We hiked up the Woody Trail, with the first 1/2 a mile being “easy”, according to the trail map. It had very little elevation gain, and took us on a muddy trail that was surrounded by moss-covered trees and ferns on the ground. We didn’t see anyone else on the trail at this point (around 10, on a Tuesday).

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Post-Apocalyptic/Dystopian Stories

Look for something futuristic? Maybe dystopian future?

The first thing I’d have to recommend is the CW show The 100. With the start of the second season in mid-October, the first season was added to Netflix and The Seattle Public Library, and like many teens, I binge-watched it in 3 days. Continue reading

Spooky Books for Brave Readers

Like scary stuff? Or maybe you think you want to try it out? Here’s a few books to get you started!

hangmansdaughterThe Hangman’s Daughter by Oliver Potzsch is the first I will recommend.  It’s scary, but not too scary.  Originally written in German, this book takes place in a small Bavarian town in the mid-1600s.  A boy, near death, is pulled from a river by local hangman Jakob Kuisl and is found to have the symbol of Venus on his back. The panicked people of the town are convinced that the murderer must be practicing witchcraft and that the town’s midwife is obviously to blame.  Kuisl is forced to arrest the midwife, whom he his sure is innocent, and only has a short amount of time before he will have to be the one to execute her unless proof of a different killer is found.  As Kuisl, his daughter, and the local physician’s son race against the clock to solve a murder mystery, they find that the true killers may be bewitched by a different type of dark magic: greed.

mistress of the art of death coverNext is Mistress of the Art of Death by Diana Norman (pen name Ariana Franklin).  This story is very similar to The Hangman’s Daughter but is much more suspenseful and violent (mature readers only, please!).  Adelia Aguilar, an Italian educated doctor who specializes in autopsies, is hired by the King of England to join a Jewish knight and a Muslim assistant to prove that a series of child murders in Medieval-era Cambridge are not the acts of the Jewish residents of the town.  Adelia faces challenge after challenge as a female doctor who must keep her tasks and theories under wraps.  As Adelia and her companions investigate the killings, they find that the King has a deeper connection to the deaths than just a threatened economy and that the murderer is highly aware of the investigation against him.

american elsewhere coverFinally, American Elsewhere by Robert Jackson Bennett.  This is completely and totally different from the other two books I have recommended as it is a thriller, but also definitely science fiction, and set in modern times.  In the small town of Wink, New Mexico, something strange is happening.  Having always been the perfect, suburban town just a little too far off the map, Wink does not draw much attention.  But now that Texas native Mona Bright has inherited her mother’s home (who committed suicide when Mona was a child) she finds that not everything is as it seems in Wink.  Using her detective skills, Mona starts to uncover the town’s secrets and realizes that something big is happening.  Soon.  And she is in the middle of it. Very well written and wonderfully suspenseful, American Elsewhere is a good read for any sci-fi fan who wants something just a little spookier.

Bonus title: If you’d like to take it a step further, another great sci-fi/thriller novel is The Taking by Dean Koontz.the taking cover

Brooke, 17, Magnolia

MAG

Three kids tessering (time-traveling) to save Earth

A Wrinkle In Time – Cover

Meg Murry has always felt like the odd one out.  She’s bullied at school, teased by most everyone in the town, mostly the post woman. Here’s the thing, Meg’s father has disappeared and she hasn’t heard from him for years now. Meg’s life seems to be dragging along until one day Charles Wallace, her younger brother who is practically a genius, brings home an elderly woman called Mrs. Whatsit (that’s really what they call her, weird I know).

Along with Mrs. Whatsit comes Calvin O’Keefe, a tall and lanky athletic boy who is older than Meg and lives with his crazy mother.  Mrs. Whatsit, along with Mrs. Who and Mrs. Which (two other elderly women), take the three children, Meg, Charles and Calvin, and ‘tesser’ or wrinkle (travel) accross the 5th dimension to save Meg and Charles Wallace’s father who is trapped on Camazotz, a planet on which a mysterious evil force called IT resides.

Throughout the rest of the novel, it’s a power struggle between IT and the darkness against the children, who have the fate of the Earth resting in their hands.

To summarize this book in 6 words? Three kids tessering (time-traveling) to save Earth.

I would give this book 8/10 stars because it is definitely one of the better books I’ve read.

I started reading this book one afternoon as to humor my mom who had been wanting me to read it for years now, and once I got going, I couldn’t stop.

My gut reaction to this book was: action and time travel, with a couple of totally awesome kids. Continue reading

Library Goings-on: 8/19 – 8/25

Teen Social Hour:

Teen social hourWhat do you do for fun? Do you like playing video games or board games? Do you like listening to music or surfing the Internet? Do you like talking and texting, laughing out loud? Do you like snacking and chatting with friends? If you answered “yes,” at least once, then the Teen Social Hour may be just the place for you. Feel free to come by yourself, bring a friend, or join your friends for video games, board games, music, computers, food, and fun. This is a Teen Space event not to miss.

  • Tuesday,  August 19th @ NewHolly From 4 – 6
  • Wednesday, August 20th @ Rainier Beach From 3 – 6
  • Thursday, August 21st @ Columbia From 3 – 5

 

Tuesday, August 19:

chessFrom 4 – 5:30 @ High Point: Drop In Chess.  Come play a game of chess! Children and teens are invited to drop by for fun and casual games of chess.  All skill levels are welcome. Chess sets and guidance by an adult chess coach will be available.

Thursday, August 21:

DucttapewalletbyCocteauBoyFrom 2:30 – 3:30 @ Internationl District/Chinatown: Duct Tape Mania. Find out what you can make with a roll of duct tape! Create roses, picture frames, wallets and more — discover new uses for this sticky product. Materials provided.

 

 

game onFrom 3 – 5 @ Beacon Hill: Game On!  Move with the music, hit a home run, crash Mario Karts, cheer on other gamers and meet other teens. Whether you are a gaming expert or a newbie, here is your chance to get some game time.

 

digital teen drop inFrom 3 – 5 @ Northeast: Teen Re-Creation Drop-In Need some space and support for your digital projects this summer? Drop in for help, ideas and snacks!

Friday, August 22:

DivergentFrom 2 – 4 @ Northgate: Teen Movies: ‘Divergent‘.  Beat the wait time — watch movies at the Library! Bring your own pillows, we’ll supply the popcorn. This movie is rated PG-13.

 

 

 

 

 

 

From 4 – 5:30 @ BroadvTeen book clubiew: Science & Fiction: Teen Book Group Challenge your inner scientist, mathematician or engineer! Read a mix of real science and science fiction books this summer and talk about them with other tweens.

Monday, August 25:

flappy birdFrom 3 – 5 @ High Point: Game On! + Hour of Code. Get some gaming in on the Wii or Kinect, play board games, eat snacks and try your hand at Hour of Code’s drag and drop programming.

 

 

Our summer programming is wrapping up.  But don’t despair!  We host awesome programs for teens year-round.  You can find this programming by going to the Calendar of Events and limiting the audience to “Teens.”

We’d love to hear back from you if you attend a program.  You can take pictures, make visual art, write us a reaction post, or just share general thoughts.  Touch-base with your local librarian, or e-mail them to us and we’ll share them here or at our new Tumblr!

Hope you had a great summer, Seattle!  😀

Edits, GIFs, Fandoms, & a Free Workshop!

Do you like making edits and GIFs?
4doctors

Maybe you consider yourself part of a fandom? Maybe you’re curious about fandoms or interested in making edits? My friend and I started an Instagram account dedicated to anything fandom related (you can follow us at @team.trenchcoat).  We have both loved Doctor Who, Sherlock, Supernatural and reading in general for a long time. So, we decided to share our love for fandoms with other people.  We post edits that we’ve created and edits that we’ve found, as well as other pictures and posts.

 Check out some more of our edits!

3tardis

2sherlock

 

 

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