Tag Archives: bysplteens

Philosophy Class – questioning your surroundings is good for the soul

Philosophy Class Review

Plato

Plato

Philosophy…what does this word exactly mean? Well, it’s derived from the Greek roots Filo, meaning love, and Sofia, meaning wisdom. Thus creating the word φιλοσοφία (Philosophy), the love or pursuit of wisdom. I took this class at North Seattle Community College and initially it was just for the sake of earning the credit, but as the quarter progressed I grew to love the class and its mind boggling concepts. Philosophy 101 took a general view on various ideologies but ideally philosophy can be broken down to five specific branches:

 

  • Metaphysics: explores outside of physicality such as ideas and question about existence,
  • Epistemology: the theory of knowledge “What is Knowledge? Can I prove I have knowledge of anything?”,
  • Logic: reasoning and inference; a majority of people tend to have something called Dysrationalia which is when you’re unable to reasonably think through a situation or problem despite being an individual with a high I.Q. (Intelligence Quotient),
  • Ethics: Moral Dilemmas,
  • Aesthetics: questioning the benefits of experiences.

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Pantomine – a tale of deceit, mystery & magic

PantomimeTitle: Pantomine

Author: Laura Lam

Summary: Micah Grey wants to get away from his life—and the circus seems to be just the right place to do that. He delves into the world of circus arts as a new trapeze artist, but soon learns that the circus may not be quite what it seems. As the story unfolds, more of just who Micah is gets revealed, and between Micah’s past, and Micah’s present, a tale of deceit, mystery, and magic is unveiled.

Quick review: Do you like magic, circuses, and stories where the main character isn’t who they say they are? Then you’ll probably like this book. Told in a flip-flopping style of one chapter in the past, and one in the present, Micah’s story quickly begins to unfold. As the reader, you get caught up immediately, because you can tell that there’s something about Micah that he’s not telling you yet.

I started reading because… I was told that it had good representation of characters who were learning more about their gender and their sexual identity, as well as having an engaging fantasy setting.

I would give this book8/10 stars. It’s engaging and exciting, although the language felt a bit simplistic at times. I found the flip-flopping story technique frustrating at times, when I just wanted to get back to the storyline I had been on, but ultimately it was, in my opinion, the best way to tell this story.

-Sofia, 16, Greenwood Teen Advisory Board

GWD

Mirrors – psychological mysteries

Title:  Mirrors

Author:  John O’Brien

Summary: A father’s mental struggle as he switches between two realities: one where his family is alive, and one where his family has died in a house fire.

Gut reaction:  Loved it!

Why: The beginning was somewhat difficult to get through. Although once you get past the first scene with the family everything starts to make since in a sort of creepy yet awesome way. It was the type of play that required multiple read-throughs to find all the hidden connections O’Brien made between his two realities. I found the play left me with many questions but I was well satisfied with the twists, turns, and answers it did give me.

Who would like this book: You would like this play if you enjoy psychological mysteries.

Note: This play is not available through The Seattle Public Library. If you are interested, you can request it from another library system for a $5 fee or purchase your own copy.

-Catalina, Teen Blogger

Grand Budapest Hotel – Won 4 Oscars!

GBH

Who doesn’t love an indie film every once in a while? I sure do. Director Wes Anderson’s film The Grand Budapest Hotel recently won 4 Oscars, including Best Achievement in Costume Design, Makeup and Hairstyling, as well as Best Original Score. This movie tells of the adventures of a concierge and his lobby boy living in the fictional country of Zubrowka during the 1930s.

The lovely book The Grand Budapest Hotel by Matt Zoller Seitz was just released as a companion to The Wes Anderson Collection. Both are fantastic reads. Go to your nearest library and pick up a copy today! If you are interested in learning more about Wes Anderson or The Wes Anderson Collection, head on over to the blog post Indie films: Wes Anderson. Thanks for reading!

-Laura, 17, Greenwood 

GWD

Fangirl – a tale of fiction, family & love

fangirlTitle: Fangirl

Author: Rainbow Rowell

Summary: Cath is a Simon Snow fan (a spoof of Harry Potter) and for Cath, being a fan is her life—and she’s really good at it. She and her twin sister, Wren, surrounded themselves in the Simon Snow series when they were just kids; it’s what got them through their mother leaving.

Reading. Rereading. Hanging out in Simon Snow forums, writing Simon Snow fan fiction, dressing up like the characters for every movie premiere. Cath’s sister has mostly grown away from fandom, but Cath can’t let go. She doesn’t want to.

Now that they’re going to college, Wren has told Cath she doesn’t want to be roommates. Cath is on her own, completely outside of her comfort zone. She’s got a surly roommate with a charming, always-around boyfriend, a fiction-writing professor who thinks fan fiction is the end of the civilized world, a handsome classmate who only wants to talk about words… And she can’t stop worrying about her dad, who’s loving and fragile and has never really been alone.

Six Word Review: A tale of fiction, family and love.

I started reading because: It caught my interest with its relatable story line and I fell instantly in love. I feel as if I am a part of Cath because I am so much like her.

I kept reading because: I was taken in by her story and I couldn’t put it down until the end.

I would give this book 9/10 stars because it’s interesting and unique. I feel as if this is the perfect tale for anyone to read because it’s so relatable. I loved the snippets of her fan fiction story that the author puts in her story. The only things that hung on me were some of the characters.

I loved the fan fiction stories that Cath wrote. I don’t usually like fan fiction but something about her writing felt fresh and original. Packed with action and romance I couldn’t turn away from them.

I hated the way some of the characters were established. Some of them started out in the book with good intentions but ended as nothing more than selfish pricks.

If the lead character was in a high school yearbook, they would be voted Most Likely To:    Write Fan Fiction.

– Rachel, Green Lake, Teen Volunteer

GLK

The Future of Derby is Now

Seattle Derby BratsHave you heard rumblings about Rat City Rollergirls? Did you want to get involved somehow but felt you were too young? That’s why Seattle Derby Brats, Rat City’s junior roller derby team, exists: To bring competitive roller derby to younger generations and continue to build the sport.

Seattle Derby Brats’ New Skater Camp starts in July, but registration is already filling up fast. Here’s how you can find out how to register if you’d like to get involved: Seattle Derby Brats.

SDB provides a inclusive environment for teen girls. I can honestly say that the supportive and dedicated members of the derby community, skaters and adults alike, have changed my life for the better. I would encourage everyone to get involved in some way.

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Jacob – What I look for in a novel…

novelsThe term “novel” encompasses so much territory that it seems silly to talk about them as a whole. Everything from Anna Karenina to the Twilight series falls in that category. Nevertheless, I’m going to try to explain what kinds of features that I enjoy in a novel and why I like them. Obviously, these are just my preferences. I don’t expect everyone to agree.

According to Dilbert cartoonist Scott Adams, “Movies and books form a mental structure in your head of what is possible and what is not. But these are artificial structures based on the rules of fiction. They do not necessarily represent what is practical or possible in the real world.” By this, he means that the principles of cause and effect work differently in fiction than in real life. If, say, someone in a movie punches a jerk in the face in the middle of school, and everyone respects him for it, you might get the wrong idea about what would actually happen in real life. Probably something closer to a long term suspension. He’s saying that if you read a lot of fiction, you might start to confuse reality and fantasy, resulting in some mistaken impressions of how the world really works. That’s one reason why I like books that have good internal consistency. Continue reading