Tag Archives: celebration

10th Anniversary Of Greenwood Library: Feb 8th!

Greenwood Library is celebrating a very special birthday this year.  It’s turning a decade old!  To celebrate this fantastic achievement, the library is throwing a special celebration.

gwd proofOn the 8th of February, many fun activities will be held; all are totally free and open to the public.  The celebration will be held from 1:30 pm to 3:30 pm and will be tons of fun.  Drop in and check it out.  Have some refreshments and share your great memories of this amazing library with your community (and the City Librarian, MT!).  We will also be sealing a time capsule.  We will stuff the capsule with whatever special memories you choose.  There is free parking in the lower garage and refreshments, so there is no reason why you shouldn’t come down to the Greenwood library and have some fun while commemorating a huge milestone for the library and community of Seattle.

A little bit of history of the library’s presence in Greenwood:

In 1928 Greenwood-Phinney Branch Library opened, thanks to Greenwood-Phinney Commercial Club and parent-teacher groups.  A campaign that raised $340.80 and the generous offer from the library board to operate a branch, allowed the hugely popular library to open its doors.  After an expansion in 1932, a remodel in 1939 and because of bond issues in 1950 and 1952, the city council expanded the budget and bought a new book-mobile and 3 new branches. One of those lucky branches was the Greenwood library.

In 1998 money raised by The Seattle Public Library Foundation and a huge bond measure, made it possible for the library to have a giant 15,000 square foot expansion. In 2003 the library was demolished, along with an old house next to it, and construction began to make room for a larger branch.  On January 29th 2005, the new branch, that we now call the Greenwood Library opened.  This library is now a decade old and has been continuously used and loved by the community.

Come join the festivities, and commemorate the journey and community love of this great library.

–Emma, Greenwood, Teen Adviser

GWD

Winter Celebrations

Winter is coming!  Sorry, could not resist a Game of Thrones reference.  Although it seems like the days cannot get any shorter, the shortest day is yet to come.  Today, December 21st marks this year’s Winter Solstice and is the point when we see the least daylight.  Historically, many religions and cultures have used the solstice to celebrate the re-emergence of the sun.  Take a look at some modern-day, rather fascinating photos from last year’s festivities at Stonehenge. Remember, if you live in the southern hemisphere, December 21 is actually the longest day of the year.  Bring on the sun!

Winter is home to many other celebrations and holidays. Hanukkah (alternatively, Chanukah and other variants), is the Jewish festival of light and started this year on December 16. Celebrated for eight days, Hanukkah commemorates the 2nd Century BCE victory of the few over the many and the miracle of one day of oil lasting eight days.  People light one candle per night on the eight candle menorah (with one additional candle, the shamash, to light the rest) and give blessings.

Christmas, once perhaps tied in with the winter solstice, is the Christian celebration of the birth of Jesus.  Christmas is now observed across the world with and without religious elements. From Las Posadas, the procession of Jesus and Mary statues recreating their search for lodging (celebrated mainly in Mexico and Guatemala) to St. Nicholas Day in Europe on December 6, there are numerous festivities.  As Britannica Library rather dryly notes, Christmas is “marked by an increasingly elaborate exchange of gifts.”  😉

Created in 1966 by Dr. Maulana Karenga as a way to unite families and communities, Kwanzaa is based on centuries of first harvest traditions in Africa. Observed for seven days from December 26 to January 1, each day celebrates one of the seven principles, or Nguzo Saba. (Information about Kwanzaa accessed on Encyclopedia Americana, one of the library’s free databases. Check it out with your library card!)

Of course, there are many more traditions and celebrations not mentioned here–what about you?

What do you celebrate? What are you thankful for?

Veterans Day FAQ

Veterans-DayToday the libraries are closed in observance of Armistice Day, now known as Veterans Day.

What is Armistice Day?

In November 1919, President Wilson proclaimed November 11 as the first commemoration of Armistice Day with the following words: “To us in America, the reflections of Armistice Day will be filled with solemn pride in the heroism of those who died in the country’s service and with gratitude for the victory, both because of the thing from which it has freed us and because of the opportunity it has given America to show her sympathy with peace and justice in the councils of the nations…” Continue reading

1,500 Posts…Can you believe it??

That’s over four years of posts.  We’re so proud, we’re bursting!
Thanks for reading, writing, and commenting…we couldn’t do it without you! 
And stick around…the next 1,500 are gonna be epic.

Celebrate!

Revolutionary Reads

GracelingGraceling by Kristin Cashore:  In a world where some people are born with extreme and often-feared skills called Graces, Katsa struggles for redemption from her own horrifying Grace, the Grace of killing, and teams up with another young fighter to save their land from a corrupt king.

 

 

Code Name Verity

Code Name Verity by Elizabeth Wein: In 1943, a British fighter plane crashes in Nazi-occupied France and the survivor tells a tale of friendship, war, espionage, and great courage as she relates what she must to survive while keeping secret all that she can.

 

 

Summer PrinceThe Summer Prince by Alaya Dawn Johnson: In a Brazil of the distant future, June Costa falls in love with Enki, a fellow artist and rebel against the strict limits of the legendary pyramid city of Palmares Três’ matriarchal government, knowing that, like all Summer Kings before him, Enki is destined to die.

 

 

Little Brother

Little Brother by Cory Doctorow:  After being interrogated by the Department of Homeland Security after a major terrorist attack on San Francisco, Marcus is released into what is now a police state and uses his expertise in computer hacking to set things right.

 

 

OrleansOrleans by Sherrie L. Smith:  Set in a futuristic, hostile Orleans landscape, Fen de la Guerre must deliver her tribe leader’s baby over the Wall into the Outer States before her blood becomes tainted with Delta Fever.

 

 

 

Fire in the StreetsFire in the Streets by Kekla Magoon: In the aftermath of Dr. King’s assassination in 1968, Chicago fourteen-year-old Maxie longs to join the Black Panthers, whether or not her brother Raheem, ex-boyfriend Sam, or her friends like it, and is soon caught up in the violence of anti-war and civil rights demonstrations.

 

 

Five 4ths of JulyFive 4th of Julys by Pat Raccio Hughes:  On July 4th, 1777, Jake Mallory and his friends are celebrating their new nation’s independence, but over the next four years Jake finds himself in increasingly adventurous circumstances as he battles British forces, barely survives captivity on a prison ship, and finally returns home, war-torn and weary, but hopeful for America’s future.

 

Aristotle and Dante DiscoverAristotle and Dante Discover The Secrets of the Universe by Benjamin Alire Saenz:  Ari Mendoza is an angry loner with a brother in prison, but when he meets Dante and they become friends, Ari starts to ask questions about himself, his parents, and his family that he has never asked before.

 

 

Poetry Speaks Who I AmPoetry Speaks Who I Am:  Poems about you, who you are, and who you are becoming. Find the poem you love, the one that makes you angry, the one that makes you laugh, the one that knocks the wind out of you and becomes a part of you. Poetry can be life-altering, gritty and difficult. It can be hilarious or heart-breaking.  This  is a collection that is dynamic, accessible, challenging, classic, edgy, and ultimately not quite perfect. Just like you.

Sundays Are Special! @ DLR

Sundays are SpecialJoin us for a Sundays are Special celebration! @ Delridge today from 2 – 3:30pm!

15 branches have new Sunday hours and we’re celebrating at each location with the Check-Out Challenge, refreshments and crafts.

Thanks to the passage of the Library levy, 15 more branches will be open on Sundays from 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. beginning in 2013. That means that every Library location will be open on Sundays.

Sundays are Special celebrations feature refreshments and a craft event for families, along with the Check-Out Challenge game and information about new Library services.

Check-Out Challenge
Pick up a Check-Out Challenge game card. Visit any Library location on Sundays between Jan. 6 and May 5 to get your card stamped. Patrons with 15 stamps can enter a prize-drawing for a chance to win a book lover’s basket and lunch with the city librarian.

Apply for a new Library card
New cards feature iconic images of Seattle and an illustrated card designed to appeal to children!

Call Delridge @ 206-733-9125 or Ask a Librarian

Sundays Are Special! @ NGA

Join us for a Sundays are Special celebration! @ Northgate today from 2 – 3:30pm!

15 branches have new Sunday hours and we’re celebrating at each location with the Check-Out Challenge, refreshments and crafts.

Thanks to the passage of the Library levy, 15 more branches will be open on Sundays from 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. beginning in 2013. That means that every Library location will be open on Sundays.

Sundays are Special celebrations feature refreshments and a craft event for families, along with the Check-Out Challenge game and information about new Library services.

Check-Out Challenge
Pick up a Check-Out Challenge game card. Visit any Library location on Sundays between Jan. 6 and May 5 to get your card stamped. Patrons with 15 stamps can enter a prize-drawing for a chance to win a book lover’s basket and lunch with the city librarian.

Apply for a new Library card
New cards feature iconic images of Seattle and an illustrated card designed to appeal to children!

Call Northgate @ 206-386-1980 or Ask a Librarian