Tag Archives: death

Thirteen Reasons Why – Filled with suspense, good life lessons

Title: Thirteen Reasons WhyThirteen Reasons Why

Author: Jay Asher

Summary: No one expected Hannah Baker’s death, but thirteen people would soon find out how their actions and words pushed Hannah off the edge. Clay Jensen is determined to listen to Hannah’s thirteen tapes to figure out her story, and why he is in it. These tapes show a side of Hannah that no one saw, and the truth about who she really was.

Gut Reaction: Filled with suspense, good life lessons.

I would give this book 8/10 stars because it was detailed and had a good plot, but was slow at times.

What I loved: I really liked how the book took the image of a perfect girl in high school and showed the reader that she has feelings and is just like everyone else.

Why: This book always keeps you guessing what will happen next and surprises you with each new tape. The characters are all distinct and have intriguing personalities that draw you in.

Websites of interest:

Thirteen Reasons Why website

-Afsara, Greenwood, Teen Adviser

GWD

Claire’s List of Books to Read!

There’s always so many books that I want to, but never have the time to read! Of the many books that are on my to-read list, these are my top five.

bookthief1. The Book Thief by Markus Zusak

My sister got this book for me as a present a few years ago.  I read the first 30 or so pages, and then for some reason I didn’t pick it up again.  My mom “borrowed” the book from me (I swear she’s a book thief – pun intended), and I didn’t get it back until a few months later.  In 8th grade, I read Zusak’s I Am the Messenger, and I loved it.  Ever since then, The Book Thief has been one of my top five to-read books.  Also, the movie is out so after I get around to reading it, I can watch that too. Continue reading

Greenwood TAB has your Book Horoscopes! September (Premier) Edition.

book starsMonthly Book Horoscopes: September

Are you at a loss for what to read this month?  Well, you’re in luck!  This is the first edition of a series of monthly book horoscopes: book recommendations based on your Zodiac sign.  All of the books on this list are awesome, so if you’ve already read your recommended book or finish it before the month is up, feel free to read a different one.  Happy reading!  🙂

 

Aries  Quarantine: The Loners by Lex ThomasLoners

This is the perfect read for a rebellious spirit like you!  Funny, action-packed, and somewhat frightening, this book takes place in a high school that has been cut off from the outside world due to the spread of a fatal virus that lies dormant in teenagers.  The kids trapped in the school must fight to stay alive until they are allowed to “graduate” by the machine standing guard at the door.  The first book of a series.

Taurus  Clockwork Angel by Cassandra Clare

Clockwork Angel

If you liked The Mortal Instruments series, then you should also read this book, the first of The Infernal Devices, which has the same concept but is set in 19th century England.  When Tessa Gray’s brother is kidnapped by demons, her paths cross with the Shadowhunters of London, and she learns that she is a Downworlder with an unusual power.  Also, this entire book is steampunk, which is fun.

 

Gemini  Stickman Odyssey: Book 1: An Epic Doodle by Christopher FordStickman

Your curiosity might get the best of you this month.  The fresh school year is a great time to let it take you into uncharted territory! Join the Stickman as he embarks on a journey out of his comfort zone on an epic and hilarious quest through Greek mythology. T his graphic novel is also the first book in a series.

 

Continue reading

Book Review: As I Lay Dying

As I Lay DyingAs I Lay Dying by William Faulkner

As I Lay Dying is told in the story of 15 different perspectives including Addie Bundren over the course of 59 chapters.

The Bundren family lives on their farm in Yoknapatawpha County, a fictional rural county in Mississippi.  They are extremely poor and Addie Bundren, their mother is nearing death.  Cash, the eldest son of the family is a carpenter. For his last gift for his mother he builds a coffin for her outside the window of the room where she lies dying.  Anse, the father and head of the household is very weak and sends two of his sons, Darl and Jewel on a lumber shipping job that will net the family a few extra dollars.  While Darl and Jewel were in the middle of their trip, their mother died.  Dewey Dell the only girl of the family, nurses her own secrets: she is pregnant, and wishes for an abortion. Vardaman, the youngest child is deeply traumatized by his mother’s death.

The family sets off to transport the body to Jefferson because Addie wished to be buried among her birth family.  The family has a difficult journey due to storms and bridges that are washed away.  In Mottson, Dewey Dell tries to find a druggist who will give an abortion treatment.  Meanwhile, the family has trouble with the sheriff, due to the horrifying stench of the body.  The Bundrens seek shelter at the Gillespie farm when they are no longer able to control what is happening to the body. The next day they arrive in Jefferson and bury Addie, Darl is captured and taken off to a mental institution in Jackson by his own family.  Anse, after burying his wife, finds a new wife in town.

As I read this book, I ended up getting really confused and lost in the book.  There were so many perspectives in the book, each chapter was a different character telling their own point of view.  I would have to frequently look back to see who was telling their story.  There is deep pathos in the novel.  William Faulkner expresses a lot of philosophy in this novel, especially Modernism.

Would I recommend this book? Yes and no. Yes to all you readers that enjoy dark comedy and gothic themes. I wouldn’t recommend it to regular teen readers.

–Dafne, 15, Teen Center Adviser

CEN

One last Banned Books mention…

bannedbooksweklogo1Banned Books Week just ended, here’s my review of one of the challenged books.
 
Looking for Alaska by John Green is the story of Myles Halter, a quirky, friendless guy, who would rather be sitting reading about people’s last words than going to social gatherings.  When Myles wants to go to Culver Creek Boarding School in Alabama, his hopes are to go and find his “great perhaps,” a great adventure that will make his life more interesting and fun.  When he arrives, he meets the confident, moody, and very attractive Alaska Young and her group of prank-playing friends.  Through harsh life experiences, and adventures like no other, Myles’ life may never be the same again.
 
looking for alaskaThis book was an amazing novel.  Myles is such a relatable character.  He is the exact definition of a teenager: awkward, shy, and self-conscious.  His experiences help him grow and change from the friendless and shy student to the confident, rule breaker who learns to “let loose”. From study of religion to the meaning of death, Myles experiences what all teenagers wonder about.  It’s this inner dialogue that separates this book from many other realistic novels.  Many aren’t able to capture what it means to be a REAL teenager.  And not just the carefree, non-stressed kid whose worries doesn’t extend past homework.  But the teenagers that also have to deal with the meaning of mortality, and mistakes, and learning to forgive.
 
It’s these things that John Green was able to capture brilliantly over the course of the book.Worth the read if you’re looking for a pretty heavy realistic fiction novel.  I recommend this book for ages 14+.
 
Happy Reading! 🙂
 
Ailsa H, Ballard Teen Blogger

Cracking the Hub: Stargazing Dog, Bomb & Daredevil

I finished The Hub Challenge just before the deadline!
 
 The 22nd book I read was, Stargazing Dog by Takashi Murakami.
Stargazing Dog made it onto the Great Graphic Novels for Teens this year.  It is the story of a dog who is adopted by a young girl, and the changes he sees his family go through over the years.  His “daddy” – the one who takes him for walks and talks to him – goes through a crisis which leads to a long road trip to Northern Japan on dwindling resources.
 
Even weeks after finishing the book I’m still thinking over how the themes of friendship, death, poverty, homelessness, family, and loyalty were seamlessly woven into this short graphic novel: this thought-provoking story portrays a side of homelessness from the point of view of a loyal pet, and those who read it will likely find themselves more empathetic to the situations of all members of the community.  Also, if you’re following local events, it’s interesting to first read this story set in a different country and then read local news reports about homelessness in the Seattle Community. Continue reading

Sarah's Top 11 Books of All Time!

So I read A LOT.  In the 6th & 7th grade I was really into sci-fi/ fantasy and then I went into a crappy realistic fiction phase and then I found Harry Potter and then the good realistic fiction. I’m pleased to present: My Top 11 Favorite Books of ALL Time!

The whole list can be found on the library’s catalog here!

11. A Walk to Remember by Nicholas Sparks
This is an amazing love story and in my opinion the best Nicholas Sparks book (and I’ve read ALL of them.) I love the 1950s back drop, I love Jamie and Landon, I love their love, I love that they get married even though they’re still kids, and I love that their love changed each other for the better.

10. To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee
So I was required to read this book my freshmen year and I thought I would hate it but I ended up falling in love with it. It’s a classic and there isn’t one specific reason why I love it I just love all of it.  And I am Scout; I was exactly like her as a kid.

9. Sweethearts by Sara Zarr
This is QUALITY realistic fiction. Sara Zarr is an AMAZING realistic fiction author. I love this book because I felt raw when I finished it. The love and the characters in this book felt so real that I could not stop thinking about it even weeks after I’d finished the book. Continue reading