Tag Archives: detective stories

NBA Legend KAREEM ABDUL-JABBAR READS @ Central Library; FEB. 19th!

Stealing the GameAuthor and former basketball player Kareem Abdul-Jabbar will read from his second book in the Streetball Crew series, Stealing the Game, from 7 p.m. to 8 p.m. Thursday, Feb. 19 at The Seattle Public Library, Central Library, 1000 Fourth Ave., Level 1, Microsoft Auditorium.

Library events and programs are free and open to the public. Tickets and reservations are not required. Parking is available in the Central Library garage for $6 after 5 p.m. Doors will open at 6:30 p.m.

Stealing the Game is a fast-paced story for tweens (ages 8-12) about teamwork, friendship and dark secrets.  The book tackles issues like building self-esteem, celebrating one’s individuality and what it means to feel special.  “Stealing the Game” also features teenagers who act like teenagers by debating zombies and falling in love while watching classic French movies.

Abdul-Jabbar is a retired basketball player named one of the 50 greatest players in NBA history.  After his retirement, he wrote nine New York Times bestsellers on topics as varied as World War II, the Harlem Renaissance, and the impact of African-American inventors.  The first book in his Streetball Crew series is Sasquatch in the Paint.

Supporting this event:  The Seattle Public Library Foundation, media sponsor Seattle Times and presented in partnership with Elliott Bay Book Co.  Books will be available for purchase and signing.

Terrier: Most Likely to Catch a Crime Lord

TerrierTitle: Terrier
Author: Tamora Pierce

3-Sentence summary: Beka Cooper is a new trainee (Puppy) in the proto-police force known as the Provost’s Guard, or the Dogs. Almost immediately after joining up, she gets caught up in two big cases, one involving multiple murders to protect the whereabouts of a vein of extremely valuable fire opals, and the other involving a mysterious child killer known as the Shadow Snake. It’s tough going for Beka, but she has a secret: she can hear the voices of the dead.

Six word review: Pierce rocks a new writing style.

I started reading because: Tamora Pierce is covering new territory with this book, as it is not only narrated differently (first person past tense, in the form of a journal, instead of third person omniscient past tense), but it stars a non-noble heroine, and is a detective story (although it doesn’t skimp on the action). I wanted to see how she did with it.

I kept reading because: She did great. It’s a very engaging read, with an awesome heroine, an interesting plot, and diverse and fleshed out supporting characters.

I loved: The chemistry between the characters, especially Beka and her trainers Goodwin and Tunstall.

I hated: Well, I don’t really hate anything, but for someone trained to rely on her memory as much as possible and is writing the story as a memory exercise, Beka sure has trouble remembering plot points that aren’t supposed to be revealed yet.

I couldn’t get enough of: Beka and Rosto. Those two have such fun chemistry.

If the lead character was in a high school yearbook, she would be voted most likely to: Catch a crime lord.

On a deserted island, the main character would probably: Immediately start working on a way to get out. She’s a city girl at heart, and practical enough to know that she doesn’t have the right survival skills.

–Thea, 16, Douglass-Truth, Teen Volunteer

DTH

Book Shorts: Jasper Jones

Jasper Jones

Title:  Jasper Jones

Author:  Craig Silvey

Summary:  In small-town Australia, teens Jasper and Charlie form an unlikely friendship when one asks the other to help him cover up a murder until they can prove who is responsible.

I started reading it because… it was on some “Best of 2011” list, so I ordered it.

I kept reading because… it was a thriller with some depth.

The setting is unique and so cool–1960s small-town Australia. It set the tone for the chilling, gossipy, racist locals and how Jasper Jones could be so misunderstood.
 
I read it all night and recommended it to friends when I was done.

Main character(s): If they were in a yearbook, they would be voted Most Likely To: be accused of a crime that they didn’t commit.

Six Word Recap:  Aussie town thriller with forbidden peaches.

This book reminded me of To Kill a Mockingbird because… of the small town, racist folk dealing with a horrific crime.  In Jasper Jones, the main character refers to a lot of Western classic books and he compares his dad to Atticus Fitch.

How great is it?:  Jasper Jones got starred reviews from Kirkus Reviews, Horn Book, and School Library Journal. It is a 2011 Michael L. Printz Honor book.

So it’s not just me that liked it… a lot of fancy book reviewers did too.  🙂