Tag Archives: interviews

Last chance to apply for KUOW’s RadioActive!

radioactiveApplications are due today for RadioActive’s 2015 spring workshop in radio journalism! If you (or young people you know) would be excited about this PAID OPPORTUNITY to tell stories and learn how to make radio, please remind them to get their applications turned in!

More information about the 2015 spring workshop and the RadioActive youth media program is below. Workshop applications are due today, January 21, by 11:59 p.m.

The RadioActive 2015 Spring Workshop

In this fun, rigorous and hands-on workshop, youth ages 16-18 learn about journalism, audio recording, audio editing, interviewing, writing for broadcast, and speaking on the air. During the workshop, the six participants will work collaboratively to create feature radio stories on topics of their choice that will be published on KUOW.org and shared at a public listening party! Best of all, RadioActive participants have the chance to amplify their voices by telling true stories about their communities, and the topics that are important to them.

RadioActive’s 2015 Spring Workshop starts on Tuesday, February 10, 2015 and ends on Thursday, April 30, 2015. Workshop meetings are held every Tuesday and Thursday from 5:00-7:00pm at KUOW’s studios at 4518 University Way NE in Seattle’s University District. We also have all-day workshops on Saturday February 14th, Tuesday February 17th, and Saturday April 18th.

For completing the program, students will receive a $375 stipend. RadioActive provides snacks for students during the workshop, and bus tickets as needed. Youth who complete the program receive a 1-year subscription to Adobe’s Creative Cloud software suite, and are eligible to apply for a four-year college scholarship provided by the Adobe Foundation. Graduates of this workshop have the opportunity to stay involved as a RadioActive Advanced Youth Producer. Continue reading

Tomorrow is your last chance to apply for RadioActive’s spring workshop!

radioactiveApplications are due tomorrow for RadioActive’s 2015 spring workshop in radio journalism! If you (or young people you know) would be excited about this PAID OPPORTUNITY to tell stories and learn how to make radio, please remind them to get their applications turned in!

More information about the 2015 spring workshop and the RadioActive youth media program is below. Workshop applications are due tomorrow, January 21, by 11:59 p.m.

The RadioActive 2015 Spring Workshop

In this fun, rigorous and hands-on workshop, youth ages 16-18 learn about journalism, audio recording, audio editing, interviewing, writing for broadcast, and speaking on the air. During the workshop, the six participants will work collaboratively to create feature radio stories on topics of their choice that will be published on KUOW.org and shared at a public listening party! Best of all, RadioActive participants have the chance to amplify their voices by telling true stories about their communities, and the topics that are important to them.

RadioActive’s 2015 Spring Workshop starts on Tuesday, February 10, 2015 and ends on Thursday, April 30, 2015. Workshop meetings are held every Tuesday and Thursday from 5:00-7:00pm at KUOW’s studios at 4518 University Way NE in Seattle’s University District. We also have all-day workshops on Saturday February 14th, Tuesday February 17th, and Saturday April 18th.

For completing the program, students will receive a $375 stipend. RadioActive provides snacks for students during the workshop, and bus tickets as needed. Youth who complete the program receive a 1-year subscription to Adobe’s Creative Cloud software suite, and are eligible to apply for a four-year college scholarship provided by the Adobe Foundation. Graduates of this workshop have the opportunity to stay involved as a RadioActive Advanced Youth Producer. Continue reading

RadioActive: A Two-Day Journalism Workshop

KUOW_RadioActive_RGBAre you a teen interested in storytelling and journalism?

This might be the perfect workshop for you. RadioActive is a two-day journalism workshop where participants get to write and record a script in KUOW’s studio. Hands-on activities will include: interviewing, writing a broadcast, speaking on the air and more! Everyone that goes will have a chance to write, record, and edit their own audio.

The workshop will be held at the University Branch (5009 Roosevelt Way NE) on Saturday, Oct. 25 from 10am – 4pm and at the KUOW Studio (4518 University Way NE, Suite 310) on Sunday, Oct. 26 from 11am – 4pm. Plan on attending both days.

If you’re interested, please call the branch, at 206-684-4063 or contact librarian, Kristy at kristy dot gale at spl dot org.  Registration required. For ages 13-19.

–Sophie, 14, Greenwood

Getting to know your librarians…Shannon

SW-teen photo What should we call you?
Shannon

Where can we find you?
Douglass-Truth

Why teen services?
I love hearing about that thing that saved your teenage life, and maybe even being the one who introduced you to it.

Favorite reference resource (print and/or online)?
Be careful, you could get sucked into a black hole of research on http://tvtropes.org/Afterwards you will never watch tv, read a book, or write a story without making connections between all the plots, characters, and symbolism you’ve seen before.

Favorite book of all time and favorite book right now?
Alan Bradley’s The Sweetness at the Bottom of the Pie has my all-time favorite character, pintsize sleuth and poisoner, Flavia de Luce.

I love to read about unusual people, places, and times.  (Or all three.)

You live in Seattle To umbrella or not to umbrella?
An umbrella is a must, to match my galoshes.  Can you tell I spent a long time living outside Seattle?

The best thing about living in Seattle is…
SIFF, Archie McPhee, Scarecrow Video, all-night coffee.SW-current photo

We know you love Seattle but Where would you most like to live?
Glasgow, Scotland, or possibly Middle Earth.

What is your favorite word? 
Word is the best word.  I’m also fond of misanthrope, and the phrase “salad days.”

What is your motto?  
Make plans.

Teen Review: It Chooses You

It Chooses YouTitle:  It Chooses You
Author:  Miranda July

Summary:  Miranda July was struggling to finish writing the screenplay for her much-anticipated second film. During her increasingly long lunch breaks, she began to obsessively read the PennySaver, the iconic classifieds booklet that reached everywhere and seemed to come from nowhere. Who was the person selling the “Large leather Jacket, $10”? It seemed important to find out–or at least it was a great distraction from the screenplay. Accompanied by photographer Brigitte Sire, July crisscrossed Los Angeles to meet a random selection of “PennySaver” sellers, glimpsing 13 surprisingly moving and profoundly specific realities, along the way shaping her film, and herself, in unexpected ways.

Review:  This book was thought-provoking and kept my interest the whole way through.  It is a marvelous depiction of the recession and the penny-pinchers in the world.  The journalist Miranda July visits many homes in America, the homes who put collectable items in the magazine, The Penny Saver.  She meets odd men, sweet grandmothers, and hipster twenty-somethings along the way.  With haunting photographs by Brigitte Sire decorating the page, I absolutely love this book and I strongly recommend it for any teen looking to learn more about the recession.

–Peter, High Point Teen BloggerHIP

'Tis the Season… For College Interviews

The Bound-for-college GuidebookLast year, I watched many seniors stress and struggle through the college application process.  I have finally joined their ranks and now benefit from the perks, but have also inherited the additional burden of applying to colleges.  As a senior, I must begin my personal quest for the perfect college, while balancing normal school work and a copious number of other extracurriculars.  Who ever said that junior year was the most difficult, clearly wasn’t planning on higher education!

While most people have heard about writing essays for college applications, the interview process is a little less well known.  Many schools require some sort of writing supplement, but the interview component is much less consistent with some schools requiring it, recommending it, offering it or not even offering it.  I recently applied to a school early decision and they insisted on interviewing 100% of those applicants.  Once my application was submitted, my contact information was sent to an alumni in the area and we coordinated a time and place that would work for both of us.

Campus Visits & College InterviewsIn preparation, its better to be excited about the interview rather than being overly stressed and worried about it.  If you know anyone currently attending the school I would recommend asking them some questions to give you some background knowledge.  The purpose of the interview is for the interviewer to get to know you in a casual setting, not to interrogate or intimidate you.  They are usually thrilled that you want to go to their alma mater!  Additionally, the conversation shouldn’t be one way because this also gives you the opportunity to ask the alumni questions about their first hand experiences at the school.

The location is important and should be a nice place where it is easy to talk.  I ended up having my interview at a small coffee shop in the Central District that had a slight hipster vibe.  Another saying to keep in mind is if you aren’t ten minutes early, you are late because the interviewer will likely have arrived early and by no means do you want to be late.  The first impression is critical and you want to seem like a confident and collected individual instead of running in barely on time or a little late.  Setting up for success is important but your responses to the questions themselves are obviously the most important.

I had anticipated many of the generic interview questions such as, “What activities do you do now?” and, “Why do you want to go to this school?”.  My answers were genuine, well thought out, tied in my knowledge about the school and crafted my image as a dedicated student who would be an asset to the university.  Then I hit a few road bumps in the form of some questions I didn’t expect.  It was hard to think of my main weaknesses and even harder admitting them to the interviewer in a positive light.  Another odd question I was asked was what I would do for a month if money wasn’t a factor.  While some ideas popped into my head I had to think about my answer so it showed a certain side of me that I hadn’t already expressed.  I settled on traveling Europe and Asia with a focus on France because I learned French for four years and China because I was adopted from there and had never been back since.  I also emphasized that it would make me a worldly person because I knew that the school stressed that its alumni would have to learn skills to impact the world.  Knowing what the school valued helped me shape my other answers in a similar way to show that I would fit perfectly at the school.

Throughout the interview you want to seem attentive and naturally enthusiastic.  Don’t be afraid to talk about your goals at the school and what you have done in high school.  If talking about yourself is difficult that is something you will need to practice because essentially you are selling yourself as the ideal student for whichever school is interviewing you.  If all goes well, a strong interview can push your application above the other equally great applications thereby increasing your odds of acceptance.

-Rebecca, 17, Teen Center Advisor

 Rebecca