Tag Archives: Movies

Spilled Ink: Today @ Ballard

low res spilled ink

Live music! Art! Literature! Videos!

Ballard Branch Teen Advisors and Ballard High School Ink Club invite you Spilled Ink, a community celebration of fresh artwork in many guises from INK Magazine, Ballard High School’s online journal.

Where? The Ballard Branch 

When? Today Saturday May 2nd @ 6-8 p.m. (You’ll get to be in the library after hours! The Ballard Branch closes at 6 p.m. and will re-open especially for Spilled Ink attendees. )

This event will showcase student works including art and photography, along with a screening of student-produced videos at 6:30 p.m. Live music and spoken word will be performed throughout the evening by local artists Roy Street, Golden Years, Dragon & Android, Ternbern Quertet, Eli Goldberg, Noah Forslun and Sophia Hermann.

There will also be a ukulele jam with members of the Ballard Ukulele Club that all are welcome to join. Players are invited to bring their own instrument to the jam, or play one of the limited number of ukuleles that will be available.

For more info call the Ballard Branch @ 206-684-4089

 

NFFTY showing at Central Library

NFFTY_LOGOThe National Film Festival for Talented Youth (NFFTY for short) was founded by three Washingtonians shortly after their high school graduations. What started as a one-day showing of young filmmakers’ work has now grown into the largest international festival for filmmakers under 25 years of age. It’s currently an annual three-day showing at the SIFF Uptown and Cinerama theaters in downtown Seattle.

The Central Branch Library recently had a showcase of some of the best pieces from last year’s NFFTY lineup. Works ranged from the highly comical “Iceberg” about Marcus, a teenage thespian, cast as the iceberg in his school’s production of “Titanic”, to a hard-hitting visual story about terrorism in Egypt titled “Trapped”. In addition to other comedic and dramatic shorts, they screened music videos, a documentary, and the 2015 NFFTY trailer (which can be seen here) that alluded to the same high quality of work to come in this year’s festival.

NFFTY this year takes place the weekend of April 23-26. There are panels with professional filmmakers and a variety of films to see, all grouped by common themes. A Day pass gets you access to all of the sections of events/showings on that day. You can see all of them, or just go to the few that pique your interest the most. There are some sections of family-friendly shorts (all noted on the festival website as “Family”), selections of historical dramas, thrillers, animation, a feature-length film, and so much more! It’s a perfect opportunity to see young people make beautiful, meaningful, intelligent work and it is always a blast.
The full festival line-up, tickets, and more information on the festival can be found on NFFTY’s website.

GWD–PJ, Greenwood teen blogger

And the Oscar goes to…

The 85th Academy Awards® will air live on Oscar® Sunday, February 24, 2013.

The glitz! The glam! The tears!

It is time once again for the annual extravaganza that is the Academy Awards.  This year marks the 87th edition of the venerable awards show that honors excellence in film. Oscars will be handed out in 24 categories beginning at 5:30pm PST on Sunday, February 22, with the red carpet starting earlier in the day.  Got your ballot all filled out?

Did you know that the show was not always the spectacle that is is today?  The first ceremony was held in 1929 at the Roosevelt Hotel in Los Angeles and was attended by just 270 guests.  The winners were no surprise–they had been announced three months earlier!  Although the Academy soon kept more control over the results, it was not until the 1940s those fancy sealed envelopes came into play.

And what about the award itself?  We know it as the Oscar, though its official name is the Academy Award of Merit.  How the Oscar got its name is not totally clear, but the most well-known story has a local connection.  A woman named Margaret Herrick, born in Spokane and a graduate of the University of Washington, was the Academy’s first librarian.  She is said to have remarked that the statuette looked like her uncle Oscar and the name stuck.  And speaking of the statuette, ever notice that many winners seem to have trouble handling their Oscar? Well, that’s because each statuette weighs 8.5 pounds!

Want to know more? Take a look at some memorable moments throughout the years, read up on the history or check out a past winner from the library, and then test your knowledge with the LA Times’ Oscar quiz.

My Adventures at the Crest Cinema Theater

Crest Theater SHR

If you live in the Seattle area, you may have heard of the Crest Cinema Theater. Maybe you are a film fan and have been there many times, or maybe you’ve only heard people rave about how cool this particular theater is but have never been yourself.  Either way, the Crest has something to offer for everyone, and several unique features that make it one of the best places to see a film around Seattle.

I recently made my first trip to the Crest to see the movie Big Eyes.  Now you may be thinking, “you saw Big Eyes there? It isn’t in theaters anymore and it’s not on DVD yet!”  Well, that is one of the features of the Crest that makes it so unique: it shows films that have been out for some time and aren’t in the major theaters anymore.  The Crest is also currently showing Gone Girl, which is already out on DVD, and The Penguins of Madagascar in 3D, among others.  So if you missed seeing in a theater that really great movie that all your friends have been talking about, try the Crest, it might be playing there.

One incredible benefit of showing movies that have been out for some time is that tickets are SUPER cheap. We’re talking $4 here compared to the $11.50 that you would pay at any other theater. This means that even students can afford to go out to the movies! Continue reading

Watch it today for optimum effect: Friday the 13th

Friday the 13thWant it?

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Joss Whedon is a Modern-Day Shakespeare

shakespeare shadesMany people are familiar with the writer and director Joss Whedon.  And most of you have (hopefully) heard of poet and playwright William Shakespeare.  He is widely considered the greatest writer in history.  He is certainly widely studied in schools, and generally held as the paragon of not just theatre, but all written language.  However, during his time, his work was for the masses.  Poor and uneducated people paid one penny to come stand next to the stage and see his works performed.  Although now, because of the differences in dialect between the English of our time and that of his writings, his works are associated with a highly educated class, and are certainly not considered mainstream entertainment, this was clearly not always the case.

As I was reading King Lear, a tragedy of misplaced faith and dramatic irony, I thought about how if this was considered essentially “pop culture” then and is now studied in Universities, then surely there’s a modern counterpart.  It seems weird to think like this, but imagine high schoolers in 400 years dutifully opening a copy of a work from our century.  It would likely seem as strange to them as Shakespeare does to us, yet they would continue to study it because of its value which transcends time period.  Based on this, it is fun to think today about what works from today might fit that category.  It is tempting to consider more “literary” works of today, but remember that Shakespeare was not considered “high-class” or “inaccessible” in his time.

Based on this, I have thought about Joss Whedon as a modern-day Shakespeare.

movies-joss-whedon-whedonverse

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Indie films: Wes Anderson

Wes AndersonYou may have heard of Wes Anderson, the funky director whose most recent film is The Grand Budapest Hotel.  All of his movies are unique, yet they can be drawn back to a few characteristics that make them a pure Anderson film.  You know that you are watching a Wes Anderson movie if there is a distinct color palette.  Anderson is also a fan of symmetry, family, nostalgia, Billy Murray and Owen Wilson. Anderson has a knack for finding wonderful composers.

Check out the newly released book The Wes Anderson Collection by Matt Zoller Seitz for a wonderful inside look into Wes Anderson’s mind.

 

Here I will introduce my 5 favorite Wes Anderson films. Enjoy!

Moonrise KingdomMoonrise Kingdom

Two 12 year olds fall in love and flee together on an adventure, causing a scare in their small town. Bookworm Suzy Bishop and Khaki Scout Sam Shakusky are both headstrong young people who feel a strong connection to one another.

Period setting: 1965

Quote: “We’re in love. We just want to be together.  What’s wrong with that?” (Suzy)

Color palette:MK colors

Best song: Young Person’s Guide To The Orchestra, Op. 34: Themes A-FBernstein & The NY Philharmonic

Darjeeling LimitedThe Darjeeling Limited

Three brothers travel across India in an attempt to reconnect and bond with one another.

Period setting: 21st century

Quote: “I wonder if the three of us would’ve been friends in real life. Not as brothers, but as people.” (Jack)

Color palette:DL color

Best song: This Time TomorrowThe Kinks

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