Tag Archives: Northeast

Short Fiction – Running by Iris & Tash

Author’s Note:  My friend Tash from London and I met on social media, discussing our love for blogging and exploring the world of writing for fun.  The great thing about social media and teen bloggers is that collaboration is always on our minds.  Together, we came up with the idea of co-writing a story. The first hundred words written by her, I complete a portion, and vice versa.  After a few weeks, a tale of girl at her breaking point emerged…

Running

There they go again – arguing, I’m sick of it. Sometimes I wish that I was a different person, sometimes I wish I was dead. Sometimes I think the only thing that will stop them arguing is if something awful happened to the family.
 
I shout downstairs, “I’m going out!”
 
As I leave, I slam the door as hard as I can and run. I run as far and as fast as possible. I didn’t know where but I didn’t care. 
 
I reached a fairground and took in the sights and smells around me. Continue reading

Formosa’s eye for beauty in the everyday…

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…most professional writers suffer from impostor syndrome…

impostor syndromeA person with impostor syndrome would be writing this blog post the night before it was due.  Oh wait, that’s me.  You may be thinking, what is impostor syndrome?  Well allow me to shed some light on the subject. It is defined as “…a collection of feelings of inadequacy that persist even in face of information that indicates that the opposite is true.  It is experienced internally as chronic self-doubt, and feelings of intellectual fraudulence” (The Impostor Syndrome).  When you read that definition you may realize that you knew what it was all along, you didn’t have a name for it.

For me, the tendency seems to be that I will do everything possible to avoid having to sit down and actually tackle a writing assignment.  Not because of laziness, but because of fear.  The unending fear that my work will never be good enough.  Which along with my intense perfectionism and self-doubt impair me from being able to simply sit down and write.  But eventually, it becomes midnight and I have to face the fact that it is time to write, because if I don’t I will have nothing to turn in.  As feelings of uncertainty fill my body, I nervously start to type out an opening sentence.  Then I usually erase what I have written a few dozen times before I find something that I can live with.  Once I get into the groove of the piece, I love writing.  But once I am out of that completely focused imagination zone, the fears and insecurities start screaming at me again.  As hard as it is for me to admit, I’m a pretty good student.  I usually get A’s in my classes and turn my work in on time.  Yet, I never feel like I am doing enough. I also feel like one day someone is going to find out that I have just been getting by on luck. Continue reading

Northeast Pics ‘n Poetry – Pumpkins

picture by Formosa, Northeast Teen Adviser

Bringing pumpkins home

Marks beginning of autumn

Tossing them, the end.

–Iris, Northeast Teen Adviser

 

The Doney Clinic – vet service and more for pets of the homeless

Walk into the Doney Clinic at 3:00 and you’ll be met with the sight of people rushing from a white van packed to the brim with veterinary supplies to the inside of a well-worn building located in downtown Seattle.  Outside, a line of the homeless with their pets: dogs, cats, ferrets, parrots, etc. stand against the side of the wall, talking cheerfully to their neighbors. “Okay,  Number One,“ a woman calls from the doorway.  The first person in line dutifully comes inside, leading their mixed breed dog by his red leash.

The Doney Clinic is a volunteer-run veterinary clinic founded by Dr. Bud Doney in 1985.  It is dedicated to delivering veterinary service to the pets of the homeless, along with food, leashes, carriers, toys, etc.  In order to be seen at the clinic, you must have proof of an income of less than $750 a month, a residency in Seattle, and must be willing to neuter or spay your pet. Neutering and spaying services provided.

The Doney Clinic is located in the Union Gospel Mission, at 318 2nd Ave Ext S, Seattle WA, 98104. It is open on the 2nd and 4th Saturday of every month.

Rabies, Feline Distemper, Canine Distemper and Feline Leukemia vaccines are provided, along with de-wormers, thyroid medication and other such medicines. Gauze and antiseptic are available for more pressing injuries. Vials for blood and skin tests are on the right side of the picture. Flea medicine is extremely expensive for the providers of the clinic, so it costs $5.  Many animals receive shots at the Doney Clinic.

Many qualified, dedicated veterinarians volunteer at the Doney Clinic every other Saturday. They will see the pets at three metal tables set up in front of the vaccines.  They check the basic health of the animal, as well as any injuries, and administer vaccines.  If they find anything of concern, skin and/or blood tests are taken, and results of the tests come back on a following Saturday.  All results are recorded into the notebook for all test documentation.

There are also several pets that are regulars, and come in almost every Saturday the clinic is open. All pets, old and young, are cared for, thanks to the many volunteers and veterinarians.  Their doors remain open because of donations and a volunteer crew many of whom have volunteered for over 28 years. You can look the clinic up at www.doneyclinic.org.

Thanks to Paula Shifley, Carol Dougherty, and the other wonderful volunteers.

*It should be noted that while many of these pets in the photos are kittens and puppies, the majority are much older. These are just the pictures that I took that day.

 –Emma, Northeast, Teen Adviser

NET

 

 

Editor’s Note:  Doney Clinic volunteers were just mentioned in Seattle Times!

Book first or movie? What say you?

recent & upcoming ya books to movies

recent & upcoming ya books to movies

When someone mentions a book being turned into a movie, the response is usually a loud cheer or a frustrated groan.  Many great movies have come to life from books.  Yet books and movies are very different.  For some people, seeing characters come to life is a magical thing.  They enjoy it much more than having pictures in their own heads.  However, for others their imagination is plenty.  The idea of someone making a movie that changes their ideas, or doesn’t match up with their interpretation, is a frustrating thought.  Some films that come from books are right on, with the majority of the people being satisfied with their outcome.  Take such films as Harry Potter and Twilight; while some people are annoyed at particular aspects of the films, they have still gained cult followings of satisfied readers and viewers.

I experienced some debate surrounding this topic recently, after my high school class read and then watched the seventies version of The Great GatsbySeveral people had also seen the recent remake of the story, so we talked about that as well.  I found many people annoyed at particular details that they loved about the story, which the movies left out.  As well as the way particular characters acted in the movie but not in their interpretation of the book.  It is interesting how many people think that two different art forms need to exactly mirror each other for the movie to be “good.”  I imagine that if people had not read the book, or if there was no book, people would have been perfectly satisfied with the films.  They were well made, just not exactly like the book.

Throughout my life, people have always urged me to read books before seeing their corresponding movies.  However, sometimes I find this strategy doesn’t make either form of the story enjoyable.  There are exceptions to this, but overall I find it difficult to so closely compare two very different art forms.  Even when I do see the movies made from books, I try (not usually succeeding but I try) to enjoy them separately and enjoy the great qualities of each.  Everyone has their own opinions, of course.

What do you think? Should books and movies constantly be compared?  Or on the other hand, should the pictures in your head from books be kept separate from the images in the movie?  The library has some great films that have come from great books.  I suggest you check them out sometime.

You can either compare them, or enjoy them separately.  The choice is yours; you get to experience great pieces of art either way!

–Maddie, Northeast Teen Adviser

NET

Getting over the Doldrums

bored teensOnce in a while we all get bored of everything and everyone.  Even ourselves!  Especially when the weather gets gloomy.  Life becomes a routine and we want change.  On top of that sometimes our past is annoying us in the present and starting over would make everything better.  Unfortunately, there is no restart button to life, but we can give ourselves the illusion there is one.
I’ve obviously had experience with this recently, or I wouldn’t be blogging about it.  If you’ve had this issue too, I have some advice for you.  I’ve made a sort of “restart button” for myself. I found that wanting a fresh start when were in the middle of everything is easy to achieve–it has a lot to do with environment.  For example, I changed up the furniture in my room by moving things around.  I also dyed my hair a less common color (red), while looking to change my over all fashion.  These are just looks, but new looks play a huge part in making us feel like we’ve changed and that life is at a new chapter.  Some other things you can try to stop a routine are picking up new hobbies or changing your activities. 
When that’s not possible in our busy lives, just a change in environment can be key.
–Jesslyn, Northeast Teen Adviser
NET