Tag Archives: psychology

Mirrors – psychological mysteries

Title:  Mirrors

Author:  John O’Brien

Summary: A father’s mental struggle as he switches between two realities: one where his family is alive, and one where his family has died in a house fire.

Gut reaction:  Loved it!

Why: The beginning was somewhat difficult to get through. Although once you get past the first scene with the family everything starts to make since in a sort of creepy yet awesome way. It was the type of play that required multiple read-throughs to find all the hidden connections O’Brien made between his two realities. I found the play left me with many questions but I was well satisfied with the twists, turns, and answers it did give me.

Who would like this book: You would like this play if you enjoy psychological mysteries.

Note: This play is not available through The Seattle Public Library. If you are interested, you can request it from another library system for a $5 fee or purchase your own copy.

-Catalina, Teen Blogger

Gone Girl – mystery with a sinister twist

gone-girl-book-cover-medTitle: Gone Girl

Author: Gillian Flynn

Summary: Amy Dunne also known as Amazing Amy is missing and the evidence points to her impassive husband, as the story unfolds you find that the marriage was on the rocks but who could have done this and why?

Six Word Review: Amy is missing, media targets Nick.

Rating: 8/10 stars

I liked that this book was a psychological thriller something I haven’t read in a while, and it was unpredictable but I personally didn’t like the characters. Their flaws and secrets made them unpleasant so I wasn’t as emotionally invested.

I loved how the author wrote the book it was very detailed and the beginning was intricately written in a way that tied to the outcome of the story. I also liked the combination of the two perspectives which allowed the reader to sympathize with one side or the other.

My gut reaction to this plot line was shock, when you reach about the middle passage of the book the whole situation changes and your view scope suddenly opens up. It’s like reading a book under a microscope the whole time making little progress, then suddenly you pull it out and can make sense of the whole text. It’s very dark, it’s very clever, and I can understand why there’s so much hype attributed to this specific book.

I would recommend this book to anyone who loves mysteries with a sinister twist.

-Teen Blogger

Teen Review: Their Eyes Were Watching God

TEWWGTitle: Their Eyes Were Watching God

Author: Zora Neale Hurston

Summary:  Tells the story of Janie, a Negro girl living in Florida at the time of the Jim Crow laws, who sets out to find love after fleeing an arranged marriage.

Why I started reading:  my teacher recommended it.

In a yearbook, the main character would be voted Most Likely To:  Find love whatever it takes.

This book reminded me of Invisible Man by Ralph Ellison because they both deal with the topic of racism, and in both stories, the main character goes on a journey.

Watch out for the plot twist!

–Christina, Northeast Teen Adviser

NET

 

Self-Set Limitations You May Not Be Aware Of​

Bright GirlsAfter reading an article, The Trouble with Bright Girls, some things began to click with me.  My goal with this article is to share my realizations due to their potential benefit to you or a friend.
 
The article began talking about women in general and the societal limitations imparted on them, “Successful women know only too well that in any male-dominated profession, we often find ourselves at a distinct disadvantage. We are routinely underestimated, underutilized and even underpaid. Studies show that women need to perform at extraordinarily high levels, just to appear moderately competent compared to our male coworkers.” 
 
After explaining the society women are a part of the article began to provide a supporting example.  In reference to a study conducted on 5th grade students, the article shares that girls and boys have different ways of viewing their intellectual abilities.  Bright girls view their abilities as innate and static.  Bright boys tend to view their abilities in more of an optimistic way; they believe that they can constantly improve.  Why is this, you ask?  It’s likewise explained that girls are brought up with praise from a young age, they are taught self-confidence yet in most households to be modest.  All the while, boys are taught to fight and show their strength through both physical and intellectual means; they are taught that bettering themselves is a process. Continue reading