Tag Archives: teen volunteers

The Doney Clinic – vet service and more for pets of the homeless

Walk into the Doney Clinic at 3:00 and you’ll be met with the sight of people rushing from a white van packed to the brim with veterinary supplies to the inside of a well-worn building located in downtown Seattle.  Outside, a line of the homeless with their pets: dogs, cats, ferrets, parrots, etc. stand against the side of the wall, talking cheerfully to their neighbors. “Okay,  Number One,“ a woman calls from the doorway.  The first person in line dutifully comes inside, leading their mixed breed dog by his red leash.

The Doney Clinic is a volunteer-run veterinary clinic founded by Dr. Bud Doney in 1985.  It is dedicated to delivering veterinary service to the pets of the homeless, along with food, leashes, carriers, toys, etc.  In order to be seen at the clinic, you must have proof of an income of less than $750 a month, a residency in Seattle, and must be willing to neuter or spay your pet. Neutering and spaying services provided.

The Doney Clinic is located in the Union Gospel Mission, at 318 2nd Ave Ext S, Seattle WA, 98104. It is open on the 2nd and 4th Saturday of every month.

Rabies, Feline Distemper, Canine Distemper and Feline Leukemia vaccines are provided, along with de-wormers, thyroid medication and other such medicines. Gauze and antiseptic are available for more pressing injuries. Vials for blood and skin tests are on the right side of the picture. Flea medicine is extremely expensive for the providers of the clinic, so it costs $5.  Many animals receive shots at the Doney Clinic.

Many qualified, dedicated veterinarians volunteer at the Doney Clinic every other Saturday. They will see the pets at three metal tables set up in front of the vaccines.  They check the basic health of the animal, as well as any injuries, and administer vaccines.  If they find anything of concern, skin and/or blood tests are taken, and results of the tests come back on a following Saturday.  All results are recorded into the notebook for all test documentation.

There are also several pets that are regulars, and come in almost every Saturday the clinic is open. All pets, old and young, are cared for, thanks to the many volunteers and veterinarians.  Their doors remain open because of donations and a volunteer crew many of whom have volunteered for over 28 years. You can look the clinic up at www.doneyclinic.org.

Thanks to Paula Shifley, Carol Dougherty, and the other wonderful volunteers.

*It should be noted that while many of these pets in the photos are kittens and puppies, the majority are much older. These are just the pictures that I took that day.

 –Emma, Northeast, Teen Adviser

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Editor’s Note:  Doney Clinic volunteers were just mentioned in Seattle Times!

Volunteering: how to find your niche

animal volunteer

Take me to the library!

In fifth grade, my teacher challenged every kid in my class to “do something to change the world.  Starting today.”  Every eleven-year-old in the room nodded, hopeful but also doubtful. Change the world, you mean, like, plant a tree?  I wondered.  What could a fifth-grader do the change the world?

One of my friends decided she was going to volunteer at an animal shelter.  She did all the research, and found exactly one shelter in all of Seattle that did not specify the minimum volunteer age.  This was Animal Talk Rescue, a non-profit, no-kill hole-in-the-wall with an owner who might have been just a little crazy.  In a good way, of course.  My entire friend group decided to start working there, and over the next two years I logged over 100 hours cleaning mice cages and feeding the iguana (his name was Boot).  It was a good way to get started volunteering, but didn’t really offer me any experience I could actually use.

I stopped going to Animal Talk somewhere in the seventh grade, mostly because I didn’t feel I was of any use.  My friends and I were not the only ones who had struggled to find suitable volunteer locations, it seemed.  Because of its lack of a minimum volunteer age, the people at Animal Talk were almost exclusively high-schoolers struggling to complete their service learning credit.  There were so many kids who wanted to work there, you had to sign up for spots sometimes months in advance.  I couldn’t help but wonder, am I really doing anything worthwhile, or am I just filling another spot? Continue reading

Want to make a difference?

Teen Adviser.JPG

Be a Teen Adviser at the Magnolia Branch.

The Teen Adviser program is for high school aged youth (aged 14-19) interested in the library and leadership. We are looking for highly motivated individuals who want to make a difference in the library as well as the community. Participants receive community service learning credit.

Requirements

  • Attend 1.5 hour monthly meeting (for three months)
  • Complete 3-8 hours of additional service
  • Active participation

Tasks Include

  • Program Development
  • Volunteering at events or running the programs you develop
  • Working with a variety of media to document or market an event.

If this interests you our first meeting is November 5th at 4 PM. Additional details including directions to the branch and a link to the application found at the SPL website.

Greenwood TAB Volunteers Needed!

Teen AdvisoryThe Greenwood Library is looking for members to join the Teen Adviser Board during the school year!  The TAB meets once a month for an hour and half at the Greenwood Library and is a great way to earn volunteer hours while doing a variety of awesome things.  If you do join TAB you are expected to do something every month and will earn 3+ hours of service depending on how involved you get.

You can help out in a variety of ways including:

  • Writing blog posts
  • Writing shelf talkers (the little written things under a book on a shelf)
  • Helping run children’s programs
  • Creating displays

I’ve really enjoyed getting to know kids on the TAB as well as the kids that come to the events.  If you’re artistic, enjoy books of all kinds and even maybe some basic science, this is the opportunity for you!

**In case you’re wondering, there is no shelving books kind of thing.**

–Sophie, 14, Greenwood

Library Goings-on: 7/28 – 7/31

Teen Social Hour:

What do you Teen social hourdo for fun?  Do you like playing video games or board games?  Do you like listening to music or surfing the Internet?  Do you like talking and texting, laughing out loud?  Do you like snacking and chatting with friends?  If you answered “yes,” at least once, then the Teen Social Hour maybe just the place for you. Come by yourself, bring a friend, or join your friends for video games, board games, music, computers, food, and fun. This are Teen Space events not to miss!

Monday, July 28:

flappy bird

From 3 – 5 pm @ High Point: Game On + Hour of Code. Get some gaming in on the Wii or Kinect, play board games, eat snacks and try your hand at Hour of Code’s drag and drop programming.

 

 

BWB

From 6:30 – 7:30 pm @ NorthgateBow-Wows and Books. Practice reading with a new friend who is warm, friendly, and a perfect listener! Certified therapy dogs and their handlers join young readers to read one-on-one in a relaxing and nonjudgmental environment.  Teen volunteer opportunity!!

Tuesday, July 29

 

digital teen drop inFrom 1 – 3 pm @ West Seattle: Teen Re-Creation Drop In. Need some space and support for your digital projects this summer? Drop in for help, ideas and snacks!

 

 

chess

From 4 – 5:30 pm @ High Point: Drop In Chess.  Come play a game of chess! Children and teens are invited to drop by for fun and casual games of chess.  All skill levels are welcome. Chess sets and guidance by an adult chess coach will be available.

 

 

science lab

From 5 – 7 pm @ Magnolia: Hands-On Science Lab. Dive into science and learn something new! We’ll do a variety of fun experiments to find out how things work and why.

Wednesday, July 30

calligraphy

From 2 – 3:30 pm @ South Park: Calligraphy: The Art of Lettering.  Learn the history of different alphabets from local teaching artist Amaranta Sandys, then practice basic calligraphy techniques with a variety of writing tools. For tweens and teens.

 

 

 

Teen Advisers

From 3 – 5 pm @ Green Lake: Teen Adviser Meeting. As part of our Teen Adviser Group, students entering high school can earn service learning credit at The Seattle Public Library while working on special projects as a group. Applications are required.

 

 

3-d printing

From 3 – 4:30 pm @ Northeast: Digital Frabication Showcase.  Excited about 3-D printing and laser printing? Discover fabrication techniques & learn about design modeling with experimental digital artist Meghan Trainor. Registration is required.

 

Check back often as we’ll be sharing as many of our programs as we can. You can also find all of our Summer Programming by going to the Calendar of Events and limiting the audience to “Teens.”

We’d love to hear back from you if you attend a program.  You can take pictures, make visual art, write us a reaction post, or just share general thoughts.  Touch-base with your local librarian, or e-mail them to us and we’ll share them here or at our new Tumblr!

Here’s to a great summer, Seattle!  😀

Shout-out to the Teens at the Central Library

Did you know that our library has Teen Advisory Groups? They meet on a regular basis all over the city. They come together and earn service learning credits by writing blog posts and creating displays and giving us direct feedback on our databases, and finding ways to help the library create interesting, engaging programs for teens.

Picture of the Teen Center Advisory Group 2014But you guys, here’s the thing – many of these teens are just flat-out AMAZING people. They are gifted, driven, engaged, brilliant people, and I’m just going to take a moment to tell you some more about them.

We could mention Greta, who writes lovely, beautifully written blog posts AND double volunteers for us and the Ballard teen advisory group.

Or Aldo, a graduating senior who has been with us since he was a freshman. We love his contributions to our group discussions—he’s not afraid to address difficult issues.

Aidan was also with us all four years of high school, and even though he now attends college at Sewanee, he attends our meetings when he’s home on breaks! Aidan also loves debates and controversy.

Or Ray, who is always willing to help out at an event and always brings a fresh perspective to our meetings.

Or Loren, who says such amazing things about books and films that you want to read and see them all yourself. And he isn’t embarrassed to gush about the books he loved as a kid, and how much they meant to him—and still mean.

Or Rebecca, who asks super thoughtful questions during podcasts and although she has her own point of view, is open to other perspectives and ideas.

A second picture of the Teen Center Advisors 2014 -- Feel the love!Or Andrew, who is crazy about music and has interesting things to say about how that has influenced his life.

And then there’s Maddie, who is an extremely poised, smart, & talented gal. She reads Shakespeare for fun, without being snooty about it. She writes really funny blog posts. Oh, and she won a 2014 Edward R Murrow Award for her writing in a recent RadioActive piece: Lifelong Smoker Goes Into Extra Innings In His Fight Against “Mr. C.”  Honestly we think we’d be better off if Maddie were just in charge of everything.

We also have Teen Volunteers who come in faithfully to do a lot of the work packing up materials for the Friends of the Library and putting stickers on books and counting out pencils in sets of 30 and cleaning off bookcovers and a whole wealth of necessary, repetitive tasks. Continue reading

2 teens + 1 library = 389 volunteer hours!

The Southwest Branch is getting ready to say goodbye and good wishes to two AMAZING teen volunteers Christina and Andrey.  Why do we have to say goodbye?  Because they’re graduating from high school this week.  Woohoo!

SWTWe all know that teens are required to volunteer 60 hours to graduate high school.  We get that, and we can take it for granted.  Some teen volunteers are immature, some are responsible, and I have supervised all kinds as a teen librarian.  What I have not seen in over 10 years of working as a Teen Librarian are the qualities and skills these teen volunteers have shown over the years: dedication, responsibility, good communication skills, organization, creativity, and I could go on and on. Together, these teens have volunteered 389.5 hours at the Southwest Branch.

Let me say that again:

THREE HUNDRED EIGHTY NINE AND ONE HALF hours!

That. Is. AMAZING.

What have they done in that time?  They have:

  • created beautiful and elaborate displays,
  • assisted with reading programs,
  • boxed up books for the Friends of the Library,
  • placed posters and advertisements about library programs in places teens would go in the neighborhood,
  • helped give out prizes and food at programs,
  • collated Summer Reading finisher packets,
  • straightened the library so there are no tripping hazards,
  • disinfected children’s puzzles, and
  • done a whole host of other things that I can’t even remember.
SWT 2 teen volunteers

These two teen volunteers have done so much for the Southwest Library, and we are eternally grateful (and proud!).

Do you think these teens are going to continue to use the library as they go to college, get their first professional jobs, start families, and move through their major mile-stones of life?  I think so.  In fact, they have already asked for the adult volunteer application, so that once they get a handle on the college schedule they can continue to give back to their community.

I call that a success!

Congratulations on your achievement Christina and Andrey! Everyone here at Seattle Public Library wishes you happiness and continued success!

display at the Southwest Branch